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Re: Alternatives to Post-Tensioning Construction

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Post-tensioned construction has many benefits in this type of construction.
The low floor to floor heights will allow a greater number of floors for the
same height restriction.  The slab provides the required fire resistance, as
well as the ceiling for the unit below.
Post-tensioning allows greater slab spans with equivalent depth over
conventional flat plate construction, reducing the number of columns.
If the layout is fairly regular from floor to floor, a p/t solution will be
more cost effective than either steel or conventional flat plate
construction.  We have used this type of construction successfully in dozens
of 10 to 50 story structures, primarily hotels.

One thing to look at is the plumbing layout.  The limitations on placing
plumbing and conduit in a p/t slab are more restrictive than conventional
flat plate construction.  Typically not a problem if the floor layouts stack
properly.  Even concrete over metal deck has severe restrictions on placing
conduit in the slab for fire resistive construction.

Finding qualified p/t contractors to come to your location is typically no
problem.

If you really want to look at steel options, Modern Steel had some
interesting articles on low floor to floor construction not too long ago you
would find valuable.

Paul Feather
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jim Todd" <JIMT(--nospam--at)performainc.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Cc: "Thomas Gavic" <TOMG(--nospam--at)performainc.com>
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2001 7:17 AM
Subject: Alternatives to Post-Tensioning Construction


Developers in my area (i.e. Upper Mid-West, low seismic) are looking at
building an 11-story condo near a river. I'm sure it will require deep
foundations, but my question has to do with the superstructure.  They have
looked at some existing condos as proto-types, and found one in Atlanta that
they feel is a good model project. It is a post-tensioned superstructure.
They sited the minimal floor-to-floor height, as well as, the good sound
characteristics of the concrete system.

There has been little to none post-tension construction in our area. One of
the G.C.'s looking at construction costs was wondering if a more
conventional design, such as a steel column/composite beam and deck system
would be a viable alternative. I do not have any experience with
post-tensioning, and would not be involved if the project went this
direction, but was wondering what some of the advantages/disadvantages are
in comparing these systems.

Thanks,
JT


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