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Re: "OPTIMUM" ROOF SLOPE

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well said. also greater slope makes for greater wind area and more shear
is needed.

Stan Scholl, P.E.
Laguna Beach, CA

On Tue, 22 May 2001 23:14:55 -0400 Roger Turk <73527.1356(--nospam--at)compuserve.com>
writes:
> Juan,
> 
> There are a lot of things that need to be taken into consideration 
> in 
> determining what roof slope to use.  Basically, the minimum roof 
> slope should 
> adequately drain water without ponding.  Let's say (hypothetically) 
> that that 
> slope is 1:12.  For a building 200 feet wide, the ridge will be 100 
> inches 
> (8'-4") higher than the eave.  However, if you raise the slope to 
> 4.25:12 to 
> take advantage of the lower live load permitted, the ridge will now 
> be 425 
> inches (35'-5") higher than the eave.  Columns near the ridge would 
> need to 
> be similarly longer (and much bigger), more sheathing at the end 
> will be 
> required and 6 percent more roof sheathing would be required.
> 
> Sometimes "optimum" in one respect will not result in other aspects 
> being 
> optimum.  One needs to look at the project as a whole, rather than 
> piecemeal 
> "optimize" it.
> 
> HTH
> 
> A. Roger Turk, P.E.(Structural)
> Tucson, Arizona
> 
> Juan Jo wrote:
> 
> . > Dear Sirs,
> 
> . > What is the "optimum" slope on a industrial building roof (truss 
> and/or 
> . > rigid frame)?  I know from certain slope and down, codes demand 
> a bigger 
> . > live load. If that is the only point, then a slope slightly 
> above this 
> . > one is the "optimum". Am I right?  Obviously the size of what 
> goes inside 
> . > counts but, what else?
> 
> . > Thank you,
> 
> . > Juan Jo
> 
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