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RE: Vacation - Company Policy

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Again, I don't profess to know much about European economy, but it seems
that there are many American companies who are in Europe to develop business
there. Simpson Strong-Tie is one company who has plants and offices in
England, France and I believe either Italy and/or France. The building
industry is growing in Europe as Simpson seems to be developing a nice share
of the market there.
Simplified Structural Systems - Hardy Frame's, as I understand it, is also
developing a market overseas.
I read that a lot of the problems in Europe has more to do with increased
immigration from other undeveloped nations. When wall separating East and
West Germany came down, West Germany was flooded with immigrants from the
east. This took a toll on the economy.

Really, I am out of my league on this discussion and both Bill and Chris
seem to be more expert on the subject than I, but it still makes me wonder
why so A&E and other educational channels praise the healthcare system in
Europe over our system here. Certainly, the House of Commons is much more
interesting to watch than our own C-Span.

Dennis

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Christopher Wright [mailto:chrisw(--nospam--at)skypoint.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2001 7:55 PM
> To: ?
> Subject: RE: Vacation - Company Policy
>
>
> >Free enterprise is nearly
> >non-existant there. No one can afford to start a business--unless he is
> >well-connected with the semi-fascist socialism that passes for government
> >there--because no one can afford to employ someone.
> That's news to me--sounds like something Limbaugh might come with. Last I
> noticed, there were plenty of businesses growing and thriving. People
> were as well dressed as me, as many new cars in downtown Cologne and
> Vienna and Amsterdam as I see around here. People go to concerts, shop in
> nice stores, eat in nice restaurants. Lots of people travelling on
> vacations or commuting to work on the trains--not one starving hollow
> cheeked children begging for cigarettes. People live pretty much the way
> I do. Except of course they don't spend so much of their time working for
> insurance companies.
>
> I spent some time in Wales and Cornwall where the unemployment rate is
> pretty high, but the pubs were still friendly, shopping was very good in
> Cardiff, just like London or Greenwich or Minneapolis for that matter. I
> didn't see any breadlines. Both Wales and Cornwall are transitioning from
> mining, especially Wales, but Cardiff was absolutely jumping the Saturday
> night we got the train back in from the town my great grand father Evans
> lived before he emigrated. Passed by more than a few employment offices
> advertising for the same kinds of jobs we do over here. In fact life
> looked pretty good. Unless all those foreigners were just putting on a
> big show.
>
> >She said that none of these kids has anything like a "dream" of bettering
> >themselves, etc. In order to live like their employers, you have
> to be born
> >into it, or (if you're REALLY lucky) marry into it. The notion of "upward
> >mobility" just doesn't exist.
> Doesn't look like the Europe I've seen, although I admit I've never been
> a Milanese assistant architect. I have met plenty of young people
> beginning careers in the professions or in business. Young people I ran
> across in London, Cardiff, Vienna, Amsterdam and a few other places sure
> looked and thought and hustled and worked pretty much like young people
> everywhere. Restaurants lodging, transportation or the shopping we did
> just wasn't that much different than the US.
>
> I'm not such a fool as to believe that Europe has it all worked out, but
> its just as foolish to imagine that Western Europe is some kind of
> economic backwater. Western Europe is no less technically or economically
> advanced than the US--better in some respects, worse in a few, but pretty
> much balancing out. We've all got problems, (none so bad, even in Wales,
> that anyone would swap Tony Blair for Dubya), but they've got plenty to
> teach us. We'd do well to listen.
>
> Christopher Wright P.E.    |"They couldn't hit an elephant from
> chrisw(--nospam--at)skypoint.com        | this distance"   (last words of Gen.
> ___________________________| John Sedgwick, Spotsylvania 1864)
> http://www.skypoint.com/~chrisw
>
>
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