Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

Re: New OSHA rules for steel erection

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Eric,

I'm chiming in because I have recently been engaged in a discussion with a
client architect in re consideration of OSHA (and CAL-OSHA) regulations
during design.  A couple of observations:

1.  OSHA regulations limit activities (which may take place within
structures), and therefore differ fundamentally from Building Code
requirements which establish design standards.  This difference is not well
understood within the design and construction industry.  For the most part,
compliance with OSHA regulations is the responsibility of the person in
charge of the activity (not some other person who may have designed the
structure within which it takes place).

2.  In the case of steel erection (or any other construction activity), I
agree with Tom that the contractor's inquiry should be of concern to you
(and, more significantly, to the owner), but I think that your response
needs to respect the fact that job site safety cannot be your
responsibility.  I'd be inclined to say something like, "I don't know, but
you should keep in mind that my role as the structural designer is limited
to assuring that the COMPLETED structure will comply with the BUILDING CODE.
It is the contractor's responsibility to plan and execute the processes and
sequence of construction in such a way as to assure a safe job site and
compliance with work place safety regulations."

3.  I believe that the responsibilities of the design team are limited to
providing a structure which the owner/client CAN use safely.  This requires
a general understanding of what they intend to use the building for, but
there is nothing to guarantee that they will not sell it to someone else who
will use it differently, or that they will observe proper safety
precautions.  Do not allow anyone to make you responsible for conformance
with work place safety regulations in a work place over which you do not
have control.

Just my two cents, signed (for Mr. Kratz),

Drew A. Norman, S.E.
Pasadena, California

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Allen" <allen(--nospam--at)3di.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Friday, June 01, 2001 6:25 AM
Subject: RE: New OSHA rules for steel erection


> Regardless of whether or not construction was bid out prior the OSHA
change
> in regulations,  OSHA laws have to be complied with, that includes any and
> all that are in the process.  Otherwise, you will find yourself and the
> contractor on the receiving end of a large fine.  OSHA laws are for the
> protection of the people doing the construction, and if the company
doesn't
> have the forethought that protecting someone's life is worth the
> inconvenience, then I would really question them being a contractor on my
> project.
>
> Tom
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Eric Ober [mailto:eric(--nospam--at)cagley.com]
> Sent: Friday, June 01, 2001 5:50 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: New OSHA rules for steel erection
>
> As far as I know, the new OSHA rules for steel erection haven't been
> made into law yet.  I've gotten a question from the fabricator on one of
> my projects who is asking if the new rules need to be adhered to.  The
> contract was awarded before the rules were released to the public. shop
> drawings are in production, but no physical construction has taken
> place.  If these rules are made into law tomorrow, does a project like
> the one I'm describing fall under the new law?  Thanks in advance.
>
> Eric Ober
> Cagley & Associates
> Rockville, MD
>
>
> *
> *   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers
> *   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To
> *   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
> *
> *   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
> *
> *   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you
> *   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted
> *   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web
> *   site at: http://www.seaint.org
>
>
> *
> *   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers
> *   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To
> *   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
> *
> *   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
> *
> *   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you
> *   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted
> *   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web
> *   site at: http://www.seaint.org


* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org