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RE: Styrofoam Panel

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Roger,
As a follow-up, I remembered the name of the company and went to their
website to see if there was anything new. Check out the following link as
they have done some lateral testing:

http://www.rcontrolibs.com/Technical.htm

The company is R-Control and the following Technical Documents may offer
some helpful information:

2016 - Racking Shear of R-Control SIPs
2029 - R-Control SIP Roof Cantilever Conditions
2030 - R-Control SIP Diaphragm Testing
2033 - Screw Shear and Pullout Capacities in OSB
2035 - Lateral Hold Downs

I noticed that they now manufacture two systems. The original SIPS
(Structural Insulated Panels) and now the ICF (Insulated Concrete Form)
which appears to be used as an insulator for below grade.

I think this is as close as it gets to providing lateral testing.

It appears that these panels, which appear to approved for use in HUD
housing, is equivalent to conventional prescriptive construction. In other
words, they are accepted without testing for lateral strength. This doesn't
make a heck of a lot of sense as the argument for Conventional Construction
is over 150 years of performance based on a historical traditional platform
framing system. So how do you make the equivalency?

Dennis S. Wish, PE



> -----Original Message-----
> From: Roger Turk [mailto:73527.1356(--nospam--at)compuserve.com]
> Sent: Friday, June 01, 2001 2:57 PM
> To: SEAOC Listservice
> Subject: Styrofoam Panel
>
>
> I just received a call from a contractor who is remodeling a building and
> came across a styrofoam panel that is being used as a shear wall.  He had
> never run into something like this and wanted some information
> about it and
> if it could be used as a shear wall.
>
> His description of the panel is:
>
>    4' wide, 8' to 10' long and about 5" - 6" thick.
>
>    A sheet metal channel forms the boundary of the panel.
>
>    There is no plywood or other finish on the surface of the panel.
>
>    There is no material embedded in the styrofoam other than the
> sheet metal
>    channel boundary.
>
> Based on this meager information, does anyone know anything about such a
> panel, who manufactured it, and if it was rated for use as a shear wall?
>
> TIA
>
> A. Roger Turk, P.E.(Structural)
> Tucson, Arizona
>
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