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Re: Tilt Up systems

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Gerard,

Thanks for your quick reply. We don't use tilt up here in Peru. We are
building 5 story welded wire mesh reinforced concrete 4 inch thick wall
buildings and the cost of the forms if very important in the total cost of
the building. So we are thinking about tilt up to lower this cost, but we
wondered about connections and thought there might be some system already
developed, that's what I meant by tilt up system providers.

I'll get the references you suggest.

Thanks a lot

Walter
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gerard Madden" <GMadden(--nospam--at)mplusl.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2001 5:37 PM
Subject: Re: Tilt Up systems


Walter,

not sure what you are looking for in terms of information, but I am not
personally aware of any "tilt up system providers"? Are you talking about
precast panels delivered to the site? Contractors, if the are detail
oriented and can get a good foreman and crane operator can successfully
build these types of buildings figure most of them do this kind of work
around here, but there are some out here who seem to specialize in tilt-up
. . . that doesn't necessarily mean they are good at what they do however.

I have always designed tilt-up where the panels are formed, reinforced, and
cast on site where the slab on grade of the building serves as the downface
form of the panel.

As far as seismic goes with tilt-ups, the most critical elements are wall
anchorage, sub-diaphragms, collectors/drag lines, in-plane and out of plane
strength. Also, since almost every tilt-up has windows and doors everywhere,
wall pier detailing becomes common.

It is used all the time in seismic zone 4. I won't comment on how effective
it is in resisting seismic forces, but I will say that the cost outweighs
everything. The building is very cheap when compared to your typical
commercial project. I think they can bet built for anywhere between 26 to 33
bucks a square foot.

I have personally designed tilt-ups in seismic zone 4 on soil type E with
nearsource issues to a type A fault. Doesn't get much more seismic than that
for a tilt-up. If you want a pretty good discussion on the behavior, check
out Amerhien's book on masonry ... very similar., Also, the Seismic Design
Manual #2 has a tilt-up building design example.

Ron Hamburger wrote a paper after the Northridge EQ about tilt-ups that is
probably worth your time to read it so you can see how this system will
behave if things are overlooked or simply not known at the time of design.
Not sure how to get a hold of a copy... try SEAONC's book store.

To summarize, if detailed properly, I think tilt-ups perform as intended in
seismic regions
hope that helps,
gerard
SF,CA

>>> wsp(--nospam--at)terra.com.pe 06/07/01 03:13PM >>>
Dear Fellows:

I would appreciate information of Tilt Up systems providers in the Miami
area, and your comments about it's use in a High Risk Seismic Area.

Walter E. Sheen
Civil Engineer
(511) 446-6237   (511) 446-9407
wsp(--nospam--at)terra.com.pe


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