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Re: Tilt Up systems

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Walter,

no problem on the tilt-up references.

I don't think you'll find much to help you in those references if you are trying to do a 4 story building from panels with WWF as the reinforcing. It would be uneconomical to do a 3 story, let alone a 4 story tilt up. At panels that tall, you need to be aware of stresses during lifting and the actual weight of the panel ( 50 feet tall) may be too great for the standard cranes to pick up and swing around. You also need a big slab to lay the forms down on so you can fit them all. Otherwise it's stacked forms and those can easily get messed up by an inexperience contractor.

I suggest you avoid tilt up for this type of structure if you are trying to maintain the 4" thickness. What you are describing does not fit into the standard definition of a tilt-up bldg in this country. Be careful & good luck.

-gerard


>>> wsp(--nospam--at)terra.com.pe 06/07/01 04:44PM >>>
Gerard,

Thanks for your quick reply. We don't use tilt up here in Peru. We are
building 5 story welded wire mesh reinforced concrete 4 inch thick wall
buildings and the cost of the forms if very important in the total cost of
the building. So we are thinking about tilt up to lower this cost, but we
wondered about connections and thought there might be some system already
developed, that's what I meant by tilt up system providers.

I'll get the references you suggest.

Thanks a lot

Walter


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