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Re: STANDARD PRACTICE

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I have been following this thread with interest.
 
I have never worked anywhere outside of the west coast, with the exception of a high-rise hotel in Mississippi (calculations were required, but I don't think anyone ever read them).  Every jurisdiction I have been involved in requires full submittal of project calculations.  As a result we have developed fairly expeditious yet thorough ways of producing project calculation submittals.  The calculation package becomes a design tool as well as a record.
 
Even so, there is a lot of discretion that goes into the level of calculations submitted. 
 
Do we provide formal written calculations for every last component of a project? No way.  Envelope solutions are applied and resolved to our own satisfaction.
Do we provide calculations in support of all the typical details we have developed over the years on every submittal? No way.
 
We have had projects in the past where temporary stresses during construction governed reinforcement requirements, but the formal calculation submittal indicates compliance with all the final in place requirements only.
 
My mentors always stressed that the building is constructed from the drawings, not the calculation package.  Where is the information the most critical?
 
The responsibility rests with the EOR, and the design drawings should be the measure of adequacy, competence, etc..  If the requirement to submit calculations were removed tomorrow, I would still design in the exact same way.  I don't think I would miss the submittal requirement.  We would still perform all the same calculations.
 
To echo someone previously on this list, I have seen a lot of crap even with the submittal requirement. 
 
It is wonderful to hear the Texas PE board actually has some rules with teeth and enforces them.  I am always amazed in California how everything seems so strict, and yet the enforcement and punishment of violations seems negligible.  If all the other states were equally as diligent with enforcement the benefit to the public would be better served than requiring calculation submittal for review by people who may or may not be qualified.
 
My two cents worth,
 
Paul Feather