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RE: Q: Short Circuit Transfer for GMAW

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Good call. Short circuit GMAW is basically melting the electrode onto the
steel, when it comes to structural steels. Very low levels of penetration.
Probable fusion problems. Is ok for use under AWS D1.1, but must be
qualified by test prior to use. Prohibition is probably a wise idea.

For sheet steels of limited thickness, then GMAW-S is a decent method, but
still not what I would prefer.

Bob Shaw
SSTC

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark D. Anderson PE [mailto:mark(--nospam--at)alaskaengineer.com]
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2001 3:51 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Q: Short Circuit Transfer for GMAW


Until Bob Shaw sets the record straight, I would submit that the answer has
mostly to do with the inadequate heat input and depth of penetration into
the base material with this process for structural (D1.1) applications.

Mark D. Anderson  PE
Anchorage, AK

----- Original Message -----
From: "Scott A Jensen/SAJ5/CC01/INEEL/US" <SAJ5(--nospam--at)inel.gov>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2001 10:48 AM
Subject: Re: Q: Short Circuit Transfer for GMAW


>
>  The following is a quote from another engineer who researched the same
> question for our design group.  "AWS D1.1 limits the use of short circuit
> welding to very thin material (say less than 3/16" thick).  Short circuit
> welding is not really appropriate formost structural type welding."
>
>
>
>
>
> "Bill Polhemus" <bill(--nospam--at)polhemus.cc> on 06/14/2001 11:08:47 AM
>
> Please respond to seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
>
>
> To:   "SEAINT" <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
> cc:
> bcc:
> Fax to:
>
> Subject:  Q: Short Circuit Transfer for GMAW
>
>
>
> I am  reviewing a set of notes on an existing structural drawing (I like
to
> look at  what other engineers have felt were important to include in the
> general notes. I  nearly always learn something).
>
> I have  come across one that has me puzzled: "Short circuit transfer for
> the Gas Metal  Arc Welding process is not permitted."
>
> Now,  I'm no expert on the GMAW method, but I thought this was just one of
> two or  three GMAW methods that are commonly used. Can anyone tell me why
> it should be  excluded from consideration? A perusal of the AWS Handbook
on
> this topic told me  nothing that I could possibly construe as a problem
> with this particular GMAW  method.
>
> William L. Polhemus, Jr., P.E.
> Polhemus Engineering  Company
> Katy, Texas
> Phone 281-492-2251
> Fax  281-492-8203
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
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