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Re: Steel Building in Alaska

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David,

	You're much more likely to have foundation problems than steel
problems.  It's imperative that you get good professional geotechnical
information that's specific to each site.  Foundation designs and
construction techniques are very much different in Alaska and Canada
than they are in California.

	You also may have problems with your building envelope details since
you have a much greater temperature gradient through the building
envelope; but this is not my area of expertise.

	For steel it's much like what you are already used to.  We use A325
high strength bolts for structural applications, and A7 for anchor bolts
except when we need something with higher strength.  The steel
specifications we commonly use are CSA G40.21-350W for rolled shapes and
CSA G40.21-300W for plate (these are metric designations, the imperial
designations were 50W and 44W for yield strength = 50 k.s.i. and 44
k.s.i. respectively).  These steels should be available from most U.S.
suppliers selling into Canada for little or no price premium relative to
A36 material.  For bridges we may elect to use CSA G40.21-350WT, which
has specified Charpy values determined at lower temperatures to protect
against brittle fracture; but for buildings you shouldn't need to do
this.  This WT material may have a price premium and/or minimum order
quantities may apply.

	Steel can become brittle at low temperatures but this is not usually a
problem for buildings for two reasons: structural frames are usually
INSIDE of the building envelope and are, therefore not subjected to low
temperatures; and buildings are usually not subjected to high impact
loading.  There are literally thousands of buildings in Canada and
Alaska fabricated from 300W material and A36 material providing
satisfactory service.  One of the main differences between the above
listed CSA materials and A36 is that the CSA materials have minimum
Charpy (impact test) values specified while the A36 does not.

	I hope this is helpful.

				Regards,

				H. Daryl Richardson

Bob Hanson wrote:
> 
> The Canadian Codes I believe have provisions for steel in cold climates. If
> memory serves me you will need to specify steel that has chemical properties
> that allow its use at those low temperatures. The problem is some steel
> types get very brittle.HTH
> Bob Hanson, SE
> Torrance, CA.
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: David Chan [mailto:dchan(--nospam--at)johnmartin.com]
> Sent: Monday, June 18, 2001 12:08 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Steel Building in Alaska
> 
> I am doing some preliminary work/research for a steel building to be located
> in Alaska.  I have been told that the temperature can go as low as negative
> 60 degress F.  Are there any AISC publications or special requirements
> (steel, bolts, welding, etc.) that I should be aware of?  I have tried the
> AISC website and listserver archives but could not find anything.
> 
> Thanks in advance.
> 
> David S. Chan, P.E.
> Los Angeles, CA
> 
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