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RE: Metal Building Details

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I agree with Francisco - Alexander Newman's book contains good practical
discussions and some explanatory details of various metal building
components and would be a useful resource. I also have Morton Newman's
details for steel, concrete, and masonry, but frankly I am disappointed in
these books. They concentrate too much on a limited number of types of
details and do not cover enough different applications for my general use. 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Francisco Diego Arcos [mailto:fdarammx(--nospam--at)prodigy.net.mx]
> Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2001 3:07 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: Metal Building Details
> 
> 
> I think the mentioned book by Morton Newman has details for 
> multiple story
> buildings and nothing for gable roof buildings used as commercial or
> industrial buildings (PEMBs). I don't think that book will 
> get you in the
> ballpark at all, so save your money.
> 
> There's another McGraw Hill publication by Alexander Newman 
> called Metal
> Building Systems. That might help a little bit more although is not a
> detailing book.
> 
> Good luck in your search,
> 
> Francisco Diego
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Effland, Greg [mailto:geeffland(--nospam--at)butlermfg.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2001 13:38
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: Metal Building Details
> 
> 
> It has been a while since I last looked at the Newman book 
> you had referred
> to re: metal buildings.  Seems like it had a lot of general 
> details from
> various PEMB manufacturers.  That is probably your best bet 
> if you want
> general details to see how a situation might be handled.
> 
> Again I would have to say contact with the individual MB 
> company on a per
> job basis might be your best alternative if you need to know the exact
> detail.  Many manufactures may have proprietary details or 
> parts for many of
> the areas you mentioned below and they tend to reuse them for 
> various jobs.
> There are not many standard *industry* details for most of them.
> 
> The variances are just too wide to give a detail for XX 
> situation unless you
> talk to the PEMB company directly.  If you are just looking 
> to get in the
> ballpark for some architectural drawings then the Details 
> book you mentioned
> may get you into the ballpark.
> 
> Hope this helps,
> Greg Effland, P.E.
> KC MO
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Juan José Treff De la Mora [mailto:jjtreff(--nospam--at)hotmail.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2001 1:57 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Cc: v.t.eskelsen(--nospam--at)att.net
> Subject: Re: Metal Building Details
> 
> 
> I totally agree with you Valerie but Mr. Effland from Butler 
> thinks they
> might. Does anyone know the book Structural Details for Steel 
> Construction
> by Morton Newman (1996 McGraw Hill)?
> 
> That is exactly what I'm looking for but for tapered member 
> rigid frames,
> steel trusses, purlins, girts, struts, connections, wind 
> rods, tie rods,
> base plates, stiffeners, bracings, roof and wall panels, gutters,
> downspouts, etc. All these for the so called "pre-engineered 
> buildings".
> 
> I don't mean to know the secrets of a manufacturer, just the 
> very general
> situations like those in the book I mentioned.
> 
> Any suggestions?
> 
> Regards,
> 
> JJ
> 

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