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Re: Masonry Cement

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 I am being confused by all these terms. Could someone please define the
following terms for clarity:

Masonry cement
Masonry Mortar
Mortar Cement
Premix Mortar

Jim K.

Roger Davis wrote:

> By "masonry mortar" do you mean "Mortar cement" or is this another variant?
> The information I have is that "Mortar cement" does meet the strength and
> the proportion requirements of ASTM C-270.  That may mean that a blended
> cement is used instead of an entirely Portland cement but it will still
> contain Portland cement.  The reason I allow it is because you can use the
> same tensile stresses permitted for lime-cement mortars.  It may not be as
> "pure" as lime-cement mortar but I don't know of a problem with it.
>
> I am reluctant to allow additives to concrete mixes also - even though I
> believe potable water probably does more damage to concrete that most
> additives.
>
> Roger C. Davis
> Architect
> SDS Architects, Inc.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From:   Roger Turk [mailto:73527.1356(--nospam--at)compuserve.com]
> Sent:   Friday, June 29, 2001 3:55 PM
> To:     seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject:        RE: Masonry Cement
>
> I prohibit the use of both masonry cement and masonry mortar.  If you check
> out the specs for both of these, in either ASTM or UBC Standards, you will
> see that the specs are mechanical and strength requirements and neither spec
> requires *any* portland cement to be included.  Both products are
> proprietary
> and the actual constituents are secrets of the producer.
>
> A. Roger Turk, P.E.(Structural)
> Tucson, Arizona
>
> Roger Davis wrote:
>
> . > Don't allow it.  The bond strength is not as good and it is not as water
> . > tight as lime/cement mortar.  There is much more entrained air in
> masonry
> . > cement which decreases the bond strength.  The strongest argument I have
> . > heard for the use of masonry cement is that the masons find it easier to
> . > work with and they will do a better job than if they are forced to work
> . > with lime/cement mortar. La Farge and at least one other company in the
> . > mid-west have a product that is called "mortar cement". I think it has
> . > the good properties of lime/cement mortar and it is easier to work with
> . > for the masons. Some people think that masonry cement and mortar cement
> . > are the same thing. We specify that is it is equally acceptable to
> . > lime/cement mortar but make clear that masonry cement is unacceptable.
>
> . > Roger C. Davis
> . > Architect
> . > SDS Architects, Inc.
>
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--
Jim Kestner, P.E.
Green Bay, Wi.



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