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Re: Ethical Responsibility?

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You might want to help them by suggesting ways to pay for the work.  Also
there are ususally several different ways to do the repairs and different
levels of repair. I don't think overly aggressive action will result in a
job. It is likely to cause resentment. They can and will find another
engineer to recommend about half of what you may recommend. Then there is
the 'no action' alternative where they may change their operations so
that they don't load up the structures.

Stan Scholl, P.E.
Laguna Beach, CA

On Tue, 3 Jul 2001 16:30:07 -0500 richard lewis <rlewistx(--nospam--at)juno.com>
writes:
> My first reaction would be to send another letter telling them you
> haven't heard about you proposal, asking what the status of the 
> project
> was and telling them the importance of why the work must be done 
> soon.  I
> would send it with a return receipt from the post office so that I 
> would
> have a record that they received it.  I would end by letting them 
> know I
> could answer any further questions they might have.  That would be a
> positive way of stating it and getting the record of receipt.
> 
> Rich
> 
> On Tue, 3 Jul 2001 13:57:38 -0500 "Bill Polhemus" <bill(--nospam--at)polhemus.cc>
> writes:
> > Some time back I made a proposal to a non-profit foundation, to 
> > inspect some
> > timber bridges on their property. I believe I mentioned it here on 
> 
> > SEAINT,
> > that the foundation often has "guests" that tour their facility, a 
> 
> > sort of
> > historical park, and use the bridges in the process, sometimes on 
> > park-owned
> > trams that are tractor-pulled, and sometimes even in tour buses 
> > owned by
> > third party transit companies.
> > 
> > My preliminary inspection of the bridges showed them to be rather 
> > beaten up,
> > some even in need of immediate repair. I made what I considered to 
> 
> > be a
> > reasonable proposal, including timber inspection by a qualified
> > subconsultant, a report on the condition and recommendation for 
> > repairs. I
> > then submitted it to their board. I have not heard anything from 
> > them,
> > though it has been nearly three months.
> > 
> > What I suspect, knowing how things are done in these here parts, 
> is 
> > that the
> > board took a look at the cost, whistled, and then said to 
> themselves 
> > "well,
> > we really don't NEED to do this inspection, let's just have Zeke 
> > the
> > groundskeeper go out and replace some o' them there boards on the 
> > deck."
> > 
> > They MAY have even gone out for further "bids," which doesn't 
> really 
> > bother
> > me much since I've decided long before this that I'm NOT going to 
> be 
> > the
> > "low-priced spread."
> > 
> > But if they are really doing nothing, I am concerned, because I do 
> 
> > think
> > there is a potential hazard there with those bridges. Whether I do 
> 
> > the
> > inspection or someone else does it, so long as adequate 
> > recommendations are
> > made to remedy what I consider a dangerous situation, I don't 
> mind.
> > 
> > What is my RESPONSIBILITY, though, knowing about such a situation? 
> 
> > Have I
> > done all I can or should do in making the proposal? I used precise 
> 
> > language
> > in the proposal, letting them know that they need to take action, 
> > but does
> > that absolve me of further responsibility, or might it mean that 
> I'm 
> > even
> > MORE at risk here, should something happen, since it demonstrates 
> > the extent
> > to which I did know about the problem? After all, it is my firm 
> > conclusion,
> > based on experience, that NO good deed goes unpunished!
> > 
> > Has anyone else here ever encountered a situation like this? What 
> > did you do
> > about it?
> > 
> > William L. Polhemus, Jr., P.E.
> > Polhemus Engineering Company
> > Katy, Texas
> > Phone 281-492-2251
> > Fax 281-492-8203
> > 
> > 
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