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RE: Computer hard drive and file storage server questions.

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Yes and no.  I believe that FAT 32 still suffers from the similar problems
as FAT 16, but it is lessened.  The issue of cluster size is still an
issue for NTFS. The difference is that you have more flexibility to select
the cluster size to use in NTFS.  But this is a two edged sword.  If you
select a smaller cluster size, then you waste less space but can have more
disk fragmentation.  If you select a larger cluster size, then you waste
space but can reduce disk fragmentation.  

NTFS' advantage is that it typically works in smaller clusters than FAT
(either 16 or 32).  It can, however, still waste space.  You are correct
that NTFS cluster size generally is not dependant on the drive/partition
size.  NTFS allows the user to select cluster size (512 bytes, 1k, 2k or
4k are the typical ones that still allow for support of all features
including compression, but they can be larger).  Thus, wasted space in
general with NTFS is much less of an issue.  But it still exists.

Scott
Ypsilanti, MI
 
> 
> Note that this is pretty much NOT an issue with "modern" file systems such
> as EXT2 (Linux' native filesystem), NTFS, or even FAT 32. It was a very big
> issue with FAT 16, but only "pure DOS" or 16-bit Windows systems need FAT
> 16.
> 
> William L. Polhemus, Jr., P.E.
> Polhemus Engineering Company
> Katy, Texas
> Phone 281-492-2251
> Fax 281-492-8203
> 
> 
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