Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: CRANE DESIGN

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Both of these sources are excellent sources for information, albeit I don't
know if they are on the "Cranes for Dummies" level though (especially the
AISE report).  

Another good initial resource would be an article from Modern Steel
Construction, March 1996 "Crane Girder Design" by Fisher and Van De Pas.
You might be able to get a copy of the article for MSC or it looks as though
it might have been part of the 1996 National Steel Construction
Conference... might be in their proceeding also.

After looking at the articles and books listed above the comment below may
make more since.  Keep in mind that the building system being used will have
a large impact on the individual points of each one.  The comments below are
based upon a "metal building" type of system with rigid frames in one
direction and bracing in the other.

Bridge beams -- should be covered by the crane manufacturer since the bridge
is part of the crane.

Runway beams (with and without cap channels) -- are covered pretty well in
the AISC design guide #7.  Alternatives are listed also... like runway beam
lacing, etc...  Standard designs vary per top running and underhung
cranes...  Not used for Jib Cranes.  Top Running - Usually W shape (with or
without cap channel), Underhung - Usually S shape.

Columns -- pretty much a function of the building the crane is going in
(unless auxiliary columns)... pretty much take the columns there and check
for additional loads from the crane.  Jib cranes work best (in my opinion)
off of tube columns.

Bracing (both longitudinal and lateral) -- forces may be taken into a rigid
frame or use brace members such as rods, angles, etc...  for rod/angle
bracing usually "slapping" is a concern due to the reversal of forces often
common with a crane...  poor man's fix can be as simple as wire tying the
two rods/angles together in the middle...

Brackets -- usually used on lighter cranes (+- 50 kips bracket reaction)
next step would be auxiliary columns laced to the main frame columns

Load considerations and load combinations... these vary per building code,
quantity of cranes, other things in building... don't forget drift
combinations along with stress combinations.  Usually the building codes may
provide some guidance here (MBMA does for sure) otherwise the AISC design
guide may help fill in the loads and combinations holes.

Other considerations not listed:
[] Class of crane (type. A, B, C, D, or E... C is most common... for D, E,
or F definetly refer to AISE Tech Report #13) (used to determine fatigue
class of components)
[] Impact (typ. 10% or 25% but varies based upon bldg code and operation)
[] Operation (pendant or cab)... pendant= remote control, cab = cab with
operator (person)
[] Clear height and width requirements.
[] Bridge Span (i.e. CL to CL of runway beam)
[] Crane Tie backs (support top of runway beam to building columns)
[] Crane Stops
[] If multiple cranes, how close can they get to each other.
[] rail being used and its attachment to the runway beam...

The list can go on for a while...  might be better to get acquainted with
Cranes in general before a more detailed discussion would be helpful.  One
thing to remember on cranes is that unlike wind and/or snow these loads have
a high probabilty of occurring on a frequent basis.  Just go into an
operating plant with cranes and you should be able to see their use and
abuse.  Don't run stresses all the way up on the components and don't forget
fatigue consideration on the applicable parts...

Hope this helps,
Greg Effland, P.E.
KC MO


-----Original Message-----
From: Mitchell J. Sklar [mailto:MJS(--nospam--at)bala.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2001 2:12 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: CRANE DESIGN


Check out AISC Steel design guide #7 & AISE technical report #13( guide
for the design & construction of mill buildings.

-----Original Message-----
From: Juan José Treff De la Mora [mailto:jjtreff(--nospam--at)hotmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2001 3:15 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: CRANE DESIGN


Dear Colleagues,
I would like to know if there's a reference similar to what could be
called 
"Crane Design for Dummies".

I am looking for a handbook or manual on cranes for industrial
buildings. 
Subjects mainly needed are bridge beams, runway beams, columns,
bracings, 
brackets, load considerations, load combinations, etc. Crane information
is 
not relevant because it is all supplied by the supplier or manufacturer.
I 
would like a reference that focuses on the structure that supports them.

THX,

JJ

________________________________________________________________________
_
Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at
http://www.hotmail.com.


* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 

* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 

* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org