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Re: converting from "American" to "Italian"

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****** Inline Comments


----- Original Message -----
From: <Tom.Hunt(--nospam--at)d-fd.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2001 12:37 AM
Subject: converting from "American" to "Italian"


> Dave,
>
> Been there, done that, would not want to do it again.
>
> Unless Italy has gone completely with the Euro specifications you are in
> for a big headache.

****** Actually Eurocodes are more intricated and bizarre than Italian ones;
euroctrats are so good at making hard a simple thing, just think that they
have even ruled the curvature of bananas and the lenght of cucumbers.

 >The reason is that there is no Italian Building Code
> per se.  Most of the regulations have been legislated individually over a
> number of years and few if any English translations exist (how is your
> Italian?!?).

****** Wrong and right, an Italian Building Code does exist (even if it's
not called that way) and it is a state law, good all over Italy. Actually is
a collection of laws, each dealing with a different subject. I don't know of
any English translation.

 >Also, there may be several regional laws depending on where
> your project is located.  I am unaware of any one spot where you can find
> all the applicable Laws, Decrees, Bulletins, CNRs, UNIs, and UNs.

****** As said above, there is no significant variations between regions,
the code is one and one only; of course different regions bring different
provisions, like seismic/wind zone class etc., like the rest of the world.

> Your best bet is probably hiring a local engineer as a consultant.

****** That's another issue...:-)
>
> Here are a few examples (English Translations):
>
> Law 5 February 1974, N.64 Measures for constructions with special
> regulations for seismic areas
>
****** It mainly states the need for seismic-aware design in nation-wide
seismic zones, and the responsability of the many persons involved in the
construction of buildings and other structures (no technical provisions).

> Law by decree 16 January 1996 Technical rules concerning seismic
> constructions.
>
****** Special rules about structure in seismic zones, in addition to the
"normal" rules (see below).

> Law 5 November 1971, N.1086 Rules for the discipline of reinforced
concrete
> and prestressed concrete works and steel structures.
>
****** It only states the responsability of the many persons involved in the
construction of buildings and other structures (no technical provisions).

> Law by decree 16 January 1996, Updating of technical rules concerning
> construction safety, loads and extra loads.

****** "Normal" and general rules about structures.

****** Up here we were speaking of rather "loose" rules and norms (they say
what kind of steel/concrete you can use, yield limits etc, type of analysis
and checks you can/must perform,  geometric rate/limit etc.; there are
provisions for ASD and LRFD); some other exists, dealing with loads, soil
etc., they are so segmented also because the update time frame isn't the
same for all, anyway you can get the compendium of everything dealing with
buildings contained in one book (mine is 863 pages thick, less than AISC 9th
ed. alone) including letters of clarification and so on, just look at the
various laws as chapters.

Then, going deeper, you can find CNR prescriptions: they haven't the
strength of law; actually there a few of them, but basically (if you are
interested in steel structures only) there are four: #10011 (steel
structures, 70 pages), #10029 (high strenght steel, 420 MPa/61 ksi and up,
38 pages, rather interchangeable with the previous, with different values,
obviously), #10022 (Cold rolled profiles, 32 pages), #10016 (composite
beams, 28 pages).

The whole thing isn't so much different from the American equivalent
standards, aside from units of measure; there can sure be some differerence
and obviously one should cross-check the prescriptions (it can go a bit
tricky here) but, basically, if a building stay on his feet here it will do
there and viceversa (assuming same loads, seismic and/or wind exposure
etc.).

A different is "translating" from /quote on/ the typical U.S. standards
(ASTM, ACI, AWS, AISC, ANSI, AWPA, PCI, SJI, etc.) to the Italian
equivalents (ISO, UNI, etc) /quote off/ (btw, ISO isn't an Italian-specific
standard, it stands for International Organization for Standardization:
www.iso.org ), but aside that steel grade specification(s) and section
name(s) (not an italian fad, it's the same all over Europe but Great
Britain) can be rather easily done (you wouldn't  always find an exact
subsitute but certainly one close enough), i think that it's the way your
codes are fragmented/overlapped (no flame, ty, i may be wrong) that could
make the "translation" a bit tough.
But maybe, if this is all you (DAVE) asked for (that is, you didn't want
your design to conform to Italian law), it's not going to be a big hurdle.

Hope this helps, even if a bit wordy.
Regards, andrea

> Thomas Hunt, S.E.
> Duke/Fluor Daniel
>
>
> We've been asked to convert a building's project documents from
> the typical U.S. standards (ASTM, ACI, AWS, AISC, ANSI,
> AWPA, PCI, SJI, etc.) to the Italian equivalents (ISO, UNI, and
> ??????)  Has anyone been through this before? Got any ideas on
> the best approach?
>
> Thanks,
> Dave Evans
> TNH, Inc.
>
>
>
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