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Re: cmu wall footings

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The photos and details that I have seen, primarily in NCMA TEK literature 
have the footing cmu placed perpendicular to the stem wall, effectively 
giving a 16-inch wide footing.  Then the cmu stem wall (8-inches wide) is 
constructed centered on the footing cmu.

(Of course, you could make the footing wider, and have additional courses of 
block stepped back in a pyramid like fashion.)

It would seem to me that the cost of preparing the bottom of the footing, 
placing and mortaring the footing cmu, etc., would eat up any savings over a 
concrete footing.  About the only place I see where it could be justified 
would be where it would be impossible to get concrete, e.g., the cmu, dry 
mortar mix, etc., have to be brought in by mule or backpack.  Then there is 
also the question of how stem wall reinforcing would be tied into the footing 
cmu.

It's an interesting concept, but I don't know of anyone who has tried it.  If 
you go ahead with this, Paul, please share the problems and solutions with us.

A. Roger Turk, P.E.(Structural)
Tucson, Arizona

Paul Franceschi wrote:

>thanks for the responses regarding my question from yesterday but i think 
>the
>question was misunderstood.  the block will be the stem wall, but instead 
>of
>setting the block on a concrete wall footing or setting bed, the block be
>utilized as the wall footing itself to bear directly on the soil.  the
>national concrete masonry association has some general information in their
>TEK manual, but not much specific design info.  does anyone have experience
>using this system?
>thanks in advance - paul franceschi s.e.

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