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Re: Competing Codes

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next] Recently, I find myself using eia/tia daily.
I believe that (and have checked one or two designs personally) these
designs are considerably more conservative than NYC or NYS building codes.  This could just be a case of
the very specific types of designs I do, however, and not all the telecommunication designs.  My understanding,
from a purely ethical not legal point of view, is that you should use the codes that you think are the most likely
to give you a safe yet economic design....in the case of eia/tia you have a well developed  and large scale code
which is highly specialized, and to me would suggest that this should give the best/most efficient/safe design.

My two cents worth.

Craig

Randy Russ wrote:
Paragraph 1606.1.1 of the Standard Build Code states, "Wind forces on every building or structure shall be determined by the provisions of ASCE 7." Five exceptions to this are then listed. Nowhere in the exceptions are telecommunication towers, water towers or metal buildings. I suspect other building codes are similar to SBC in this regard.
 
Telecommunications towers are routinely designed for EIA/TIA-222-F. Water towers use a code put out by AWWA. Metal building manufacturers design to an MBMA code.
 
My question is this. By what legal authority are these other codes allowed? I am somewhat familiar with EIA/TIA. In the first paragraph they state that "....these standards are not intended to replace or supersede applicable codes." If the EIA/TIA code is used without checking against ASCE 7, isn't that superseding?
 
Randy Russ
Russ Engineering Group, Inc.
Baton Rouge, La.

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