Need a book? Engineering books recommendations...

Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

Re: Engineering Education & Professional Practice

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Don't forget that there are two Cal Polys. They are equally good but I am
prejudiced having taught structures there for a few years- at Cal Poly
Pomona.

Stan Scholl, P.E.
Laguna Beach, CA

On Wed, 12 Dec 2001 09:30:47 -0800 Neil Moore <nmoore(--nospam--at)innercite.com>
writes:
> Couple of things I found out after I graduated from Cal Poly in 1960 
> in
> Architectural Engineering with a structural option:
> 
> 1.	The AE Poly grads were about two years ahead of any of the 
> engineers
> coming out of the schools here on the West coast.
> 2.	The employers were able to make money on us almost 
> immediately.
> 
> As the late George Hasslein said:  "It isn't that Cal Poly is so 
> good, it's
> because the other schools are so bad!"
> 
> Neil Moore, S.E.
> neil moore and associates
> 
> 
> 
> At 08:53 AM 12/12/2001 -0800, you wrote:
> >I cannot remain silent on this issue...I was taught many of the 
> things you
> >list below, Christopher.  I learned dimensional analysis in JC 
> chemistry
> >(Delta College in Stockton), as well as problem solving technicques 
> and
> >organization (in physics), communication and innovation (JC 
> engineering
> >materials).  At Cal Poly, we were required to do actual building 
> designs for
> >lab projects (ARCE '82) and draw details in our structures classes
> >addressing things like load path, as well as learn things like 
> specification
> >writing and architectural detailing etc.  I guess I am fortunate to 
> have had
> >some excellent professors and having had the opportunity to attend 
> Cal Poly
> >SLO.  So, they can and in some cases actually do train engineers 
> for at
> >least some of the real world stuff. 
> >
> >-----Original Message-----
> >From: Christopher Wright [mailto:chrisw(--nospam--at)skypoint.com]
> >Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2001 8:24 AM
> >To: ?
> >Subject: Re: Engineering Education & Professional Practice
> >
> >
> >>I don't expect to ever find a graduate from a any structural 
> engineering
> >>program that is trained for the kind of structural engineering 
> that I do:
> >I don't expect a new graduate to be trained for any real world 
> >assignment. Students learn the sorts of things they'll need to 
> train 
> >themselves to be engineers. Students rarely learn anything about 
> >innovation, people skills, communication, logical validation, 
> organizing 
> >an approach, budgeting time and effort, distinguishing between an 
> issue, 
> >a problem and a question, all the things we had to learn from 
> mentors or 
> >by cleaning up after blunders. Such things just don't happen in 
> schools 
> >because it's necessary to learn a lot of first principles before 
> you can 
> >learn how they fit into a real world design project.
> >
> >This is no criticism of education, it's just a fact that educators 
> have 
> >one job, engineers have another.  
> >
> >I enjoyed your experience with mentoring, Nels. It's a good post 
> and 
> >students on the list should take notice. One of the good things 
> about my 
> >co-op experience was getting into a mentoring system before I 
> figured I 
> >knew too much. All I had to do was follow instructions and not be 
> too 
> >much of a pain in the ass. Then if I had a question someone was 
> always 
> >willing to help, from a machinist who patiently explained the 
> difference 
> >between a 1/2 inch pipe thread and a 1/2-13 UNC to the engineers 
> who 
> >taught me about dimensional analysis and patched up my sketchy 
> >understanding of thermo.
> >
> >Christopher Wright P.E.    |"They couldn't hit an elephant from
> >chrisw(--nospam--at)skypoint.com        | this distance"   (last words of Gen.
> >___________________________| John Sedgwick, Spotsylvania 1864)
> >http://www.skypoint.com/~chrisw
> >
> >******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
> >*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
> >* 
> >*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
> >*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
> >*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
> >*
> >*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
> >*
> >*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
> >*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
> >*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
> >*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
> >******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ******** 
> > 
> 
> 
> ******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
> *   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
> * 
> *   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
> *   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
> *   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
> *
> *   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
> *
> *   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
> *   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
> *   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
> *   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
> ******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ******** 

******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********