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RE: Algerian Diploma

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: Djebli, Ahcene
>
> Thank you for your concern. When I came here in Nov. 1984 I had
> my diploma.
> It was translated to English, since it was in French. The original one was
> kept at the Algerian embassy, and I was given the translated copy
> to be sent
> to the universities that I am aaplying to be accepted in their
> programs. Is it clear, now? thank you again.
>

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bill Polhemus
>
> Just curious. Why do YOU not have your diploma? As you know coming from a
> U.S. graduate program, we receive our original diplomas ourselves to keep.
>


The following may not be directly applicable to this circumstance, and is
not intended to be a criticism of the actions of any particular person.
However there is currently a related issue in Canada with respect to the
recruitment of overseas doctors. I should also declare a conflict of
interest - I was born and educated in the UK, but I now live and work in
Canada.

In many countries the education system, including university education, is
partially or fully funded by the government.

Particularly in poorer countries, this expenditure represents a significant
investment that is intended to provide a benefit to the country in the
future - for it is trained doctors and engineers that can contribute most to
improving the living standards of the population as a whole.

Accordingly, when educated citizens leave those countries for wealthier
countries the country has suffered a significant loss that it is not easily
able to replace. It would therefore not be unexpected that any country that
has made such an investment would be reluctant to lose it - hence
restrictions on emigration, money controls, requirements to pay back the
cost of education, delays in certifying educational records, etc.

For many years Canada has been encouraging the immigration of doctors from,
amongst other places, South Africa. Those doctors are well-trained,
competent, etc. But in the bigger picture this practice is probably
unethical because it inevitably leaves citizens who are already
poorly-serviced with an even lower level of service. It certainly seems
strange that one branch of the government is encouraging such immigration
whilst at the same time another branch is funding aid programs (medical
services, rural sanitation programs, etc) to those same countries.

...Of course this also represents a clash between the rights of the
individual and the rights of society as a whole - a question that we are
unlikely to resolve on this forum!


Peter James


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