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Re: Excavating close to a building

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It sounds like your building is on the property line. If so, I think you
will find in the Code a provision that requires you to lower or protect
your footings if someone excavates below. This is a common occurance
regarding basements built on adjacent properties.
In any case I don't see how shoring will help. Shoring deflects. 
The loads from a simple metal building are usually low and concentrated
at the ridid frames.
Can the sewer be moved a little farther away?

Stan Scholl, P.E.
Laguna Beach, CA

On Fri, 21 Dec 2001 09:15:46 -0600 "RISSELL, MICHAEL E
[Non-Pharmacia/1000]" <michael.e.rissell(--nospam--at)monsanto.com> writes:
> My home town in west central Missouri is installing new sewers.  My 
> dad has
> a 30 year old pre-engineered metal building, 45'x60', slab on grade 
> with
> footings 3' below grade, I think.  The city wants to run a new 22" 
> HDPE
> sewer along the 60' side of the building, 6' from the edge of the 
> building,
> 10' deep.  The building is still in excellent shape and there has 
> never been
> any problems with settling, concrete cracking, etc.  Their 
> construction plan
> is to use trench boxes at the joints and then backfill in 2' to 3' 
> lifts and
> compact to 95% Proctor.  I indicated a big concern with undermining 
> of the
> foundation and thought sheet piling was the only sure way to keep 
> the
> integrity of the foundation and surrounding soil intact.  Obviously 
> the city
> does not want to go to that expense and stands behind the contract 
> with
> their contractor that says he is bonded and insured.  Their engineer 
> also
> pointed to a similar installation they performed 2 years ago 
> adjacent to a
> house, with no problems resulting.  As most of the houses in this 
> area have
> basements, I think we have an apples and oranges comparison.  No 
> soils
> reports exist for this area and the city also doesn't want that 
> expense.  My
> concern also is that even if this gets installed with no problems at 
> the
> time, settling could occur 2, 3, or 5 years down the road and it 
> would be
> hard/impossible to get any relief at that time, with legal 
> proceedings
> almost surely required.  Prevention is much better than a cure 
> anytime!
> Anyone have any thoughts on ways to convince them to do this the 
> right way?
> Or am I being overly conservative?
> 
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