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Re: Ethic's Question

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Ray, and Steve,

	This is an excellent reply, Ray; however, I think it's not quite
complete.

	I think it's important that the seriousness of the subject code
violation be considered.  I have the impression that Steve is a fairly
young engineer as opposed to being a senior engineer just recently
relocated.  The following suggestions are based on this impression; if
I'm wrong please forgive me.

	This would appear to be a career choice, therefore, unless there is a
serious risk to person and/or property, the final coarse of action
should be well reasoned and not impulsive.  I see no need to make a
career choice today, or Monday for that matter; it can wait for a week
or two or more if needs be.

	I would suggest, firstly, Steve, that you confide privately with two or
three senior engineers to get some advice on the seriousness of the code
violation.  Two of the "better" engineers who have both responded to
this thread and who have provided excellent responses to other threads
are Paul Feather and Christopher Wright (but there are many others who
are also excellent and also have intimate knowledge of the applicable
codes), while you, Ray, are probably the most knowledgeable and
realistic regarding the political, legal, and ethical side of this
problem.  I'm suggesting private correspondence as opposed to "on the
list" because publishing confidential office business on the list may
not be a very prudent thing to do (regardless of how much I and others
might like to see it and help).

	Following these discussions (or correspondence, as the case may be) you
should have a much better idea of what you have to do.  One of the more
important things you have to do is determine is whether the boss is
lacking in knowledge of the code (which is something you and he can
correct in short order), or whether he has a bad attitude (which is
something you can have no part in correcting).

	In the mean time, Steve, you should do what you're told but keep
detailed notes and take a few photographs.  You should be able to
correct even fairly serious code violations at a later date.

	Finding other employment may or may not be a necessary part of your
action.  Whether you go or stay you will probably need to confront the
problem.  (The problem, not the boss!)  It would be a very bad precedent
in your career to leave a technical problem with one of your projects
unresolved.

	Good luck to you, Steve.  To Paul, Christopher, and Ray, I hope I
haven't volunteered your time inappropriately.

				Regards to all,

				H. Daryl Richardson

Ray Pixley wrote:
>
> Not really.
>
> The concern Steve has is, given the set of circumstances he has presented, what are his rights and responsibilities?  Prehaps in more realistic, what are his options in this situation?
>
> Further complicating the issue is how these rights and responsibilities are related to those he has to his employer, to his profession, and to the general public.  Sometimes they are in conflict.  Also, these rights and responsibilities will vary from juristiction to juristiction and sometime from contract to contract.  And they are not static, they are constantly changing.
>
> While the advice given in this list is given with the best of intentions by its participants, in the long run engineers don't decide these matters.  Juries of ordinary citizens do, at least in the US, with help from lawyers, caselaw, and legislated laws.
>
> The unfortunate thing is that the most viable option appears to be to find another employer, i.e. to "run away".  I don't know of anyone who likes this option, but the current political climate and, dare I say, professional societies climate doesn't really allow any other affordable choice.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Rhkratzse(--nospam--at)aol.com
> Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 00:37:50 EST
> To: rpixley(--nospam--at)engineer.com, seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Re: Ethic's Question
> >
> > In a message dated 1/3/02 6:18:20 PM, rpixley(--nospam--at)engineer.com writes:
> >
> > << Lacking any better suggestions, contact an attorney for guidence.  Look
> > for one who has some knowledge of ethics. >>
> >
> > This is sarcasm, right?
> >
>
> --
>
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