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RE: Warning to HP Calculator Users

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Rich,

I was thinking the same thing after all of these stories - well said.

Luckily for me, I have a 48GX which takes regular   (AAA or AA - can't
remember) so I won't have to go hunting for batteries if they stop
supporting the product. Hopefully it proves as durable as some of the older
calculators we've now heard about.

-gerard
SJ, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: richard lewis [mailto:rlewistx(--nospam--at)juno.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2002 1:36 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Warning to HP Calculator Users


Looks to me that the real blame here for the demise of the HP calculator
is HP themselves.  They shouldn't have made such a reliable calculator!
Look at all the 41's, 67's, etc. still working today, on only marginal
battery replacement!  I still use my trusty 15C, which is my first and
only HP, and I can count on one hand the number of times I have replaced
the batteries in almost 20 years.  HP needed to make poorer equipment
that would have forced us to buy more and more of them over the years.
After all, how many of us would like to be driving around in the very
first car we ever purchased?  No, it's HP's fault.  They should have
changed the package up more, using shiny new blue colors and styles that
would have demanded we buy a new one just to seem hip!  Maybe someone
could develop an after market cover for the HP 41 like they have for cell
phones so that it would come into style again?

I think another here problem is that the government did not step in and
regulate HP years ago, slap some environmental upgrade restrictions on
them, and require that there products expire after 5 years of use.  I
recently went looking to purchase a freezer.  When I asked the salesman
what the expected life of an appliance was he said it depended on when it
was made.  If you bought one before 1979 it would last 25 years or more.
After 1979 you could only expect it to last 10-15 years because
government energy regulations brought the quality down.  Let's see, price
goes up for regulations, life goes down.  That makes sense!

Ah, American innovation!  Who would have thought we would build something
so good and that would last so long?


Rich


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