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Re: Brick Dome Design

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	Jeff,
		While masonry domes have been around a long time, you have a
more modern option: a concrete dome with a thin-brick veneer. These are
thinner than soaps, and have dovetails in the back for mechanical bond. They
are manufactured to tighter tolerances than regular brick. This allows a
formliner to hold them in place during concrete placement.
		One information source is a formliner manufacturer, Scott
System, www.scottsystem.com, 303-341-1400, in Aurora, Colorado. There are
others with whom I am unfamiliar.
	HTH.
	Jim Getaz
	Shockey Precast Group
	Winchester, Virginia

From: "JEFF  CORONADO" <jcse(--nospam--at)flash.net>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Subject: Brick Dome Design

We have been requested to design a brick dome such as what you might see in
a church so as to comply with UBC seismic zone 4.  The diameter of the dome
is on the order of 15 feet.  It will only be visible from the inside of the
structure (i.e. a ceiling).  We can throw whatever structure we need to it
above the dome.

The client was explicit in that they did not want "hand waiving" and by "by
experience".... They want solid calculation justification.

I am not sure how to go about adding reinforcement to this or what to do to
justify.  Any suggestions?

Jeff Coronado, S.E.
West Covina, CA


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