Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

Re: Flat Slabs

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Punching shear is usually your greatest concern.  Since punching failure usually means disaster, take no chances.  With the strong possibility of shifting storage loads, not to mention the heavy moving load due to the fork lift, column joint integrity should be a top priority for you.  Drop panels may prove necessary.  Check out Decon Studrails at http://www.studrails.com/introduction.asp.  This type of shear reinforcement can vastly improve column joint performance in flat plates and flat slabs with drop panels.  Distrust the equivalent frame method with strong, variable pattern loading.  You may want to visit http://www.concsoft.com/ and consider the Floor program.  It's mainly for post-tensioned slabs, but can be used with conventional work.  It's potentially quite valuable for evaluating pattern loading that could produce biaxial moments at the column/pile.  E-mail back for a contact name.  The PTI has some publications you may want to study.  Go to www.post-tensioning.org.
Tom



Thomas B. Higgins, P.E., S.E.

Group Mackenzie
0690 S.W. Bancroft Street
Portland, OR 97201
Phone (503) 224-9560
Fax (503) 228-1285
<http://www.groupmackenzie.com>
This e-mail is confidential, may be legally privileged, and is intended solely for the addressee.  If you are not the intended recipient, access is prohibited.  As e-mail can be altered, its integrity is not guaranteed.



>>> "Michael Zaitz" <mzaitz(--nospam--at)hgbd.com> 09/20 12:00 PM >>>
Hello all;

We are looking at a preliminary design for a flat slab floor (at grade)
supported by precast piles at 12'-6" o.c. each way.  The floor must
support a 800 psf live load.  We also have a forklift carrying a 7000
lbs roll of paper (trying to get more information on this).  They have
not informed us of any rack storage in the building.  At present we are
looking at a 12" slab as a starting point.  Having only done one flat
slab project (actually checking an existing building to insure it was
designed for vertical expansion) I am trying to find out about any
pitfalls I may need to look out for.  Based on limited investigation
there may be a need for drop panels (don't think so for sure but is a
possibility).  Also would love to get some ideas for references on the
design of flat slabs.

Mike


******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp 
* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp 
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ******** 


******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
*
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********