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Re: Horizontal Tank Concrete Saddle Design

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James,

	Thank you, James.

				Regards,

				H. Daryl Richardson

JamesFulton(--nospam--at)Rohmhaas.com wrote:
>
> For a long time the "Zick" paper (L.P.Zick) was considered to be the
> definitive reference for the design of the tank and saddle support. I
> suspect
> it still is. It originally appeared in the September 1951 issue of "The
> Welding Journal Research Supplement".  A reprinted and corrected version
> appears in STEEL PLATE ENGINEERING DATA (Part VI, pp35-47), published in
> December 1992 by American Iron and Steel Institute. Most of the focus of
> the
> paper is on the tank design, with a small section on Design of Saddles
> (p.43), where mention is made of both steel and concrete saddle supports.
> Note this section is primarily on load determination for saddle design, not
> design of the saddle structure itself.
>
> ______________________________ Reply Separator
> _________________________________
> Subject: Re: Horizontal Tank Concrete Saddle Design
> Author:  <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org> (Daryl Richardson <h.d.richardson(--nospam--at)shaw.ca>) at
> ROH
> Date:    2/5/2002 12:35 PM
>
> James,
>
>      You've now got my attention!
>
>      I've designed foundations or support structures for literally hundreds
> of horizontal vessels and exchangers on literally dozens of
> petrochemical projects.  These have ranged in size from very small
> vessels which could rest on a pile cap supported by a single pile up to
> 22 feet in diameter by 240 feet long.  To date I have never seen a
> vessel saddle that was anything other than steel, fabricated as part of
> the vessel itself.
>
>      I'm not sure I understand why you would like to do anything
> differently; but I would like to read the Zick paper myself.  Could you
> give me a reference please.
>
>      I can visualize some problems using concrete saddles.
> 1.)  Normally, the transfer of the vertical load from the vessel is
> largely through  welds between the "horns" of the saddles and the vessel
> side wall.  Using concrete saddles you would be relying on bearing on
> the bottom of the vessel which would greatly impact on the design of the
> vessel.  You might be able to use shear keys on the side of the vessel
> grouted into the saddle.
> 2.)  Design of the sliding end could be quite challenging.  Perhaps some
> type of sling would work; then it wouldn't matter whether you used a
> steel ar a concrete saddle.
>
>      This promises to be "verrry interestink"  I can hardly wait to read
> the
> other replies.
>
>      Good luck with this investigation.
>
>                     Regards,
>
>                     H. Daryl Richardson
>
> JamesFulton(--nospam--at)Rohmhaas.com wrote:
> >
> > I am interested in any references on this, particularly on slide bearing
> > design. The only design reference I've got is the Zick paper. Here, the
> > resultant horizontal component of tank bearing stress distribution along
> > the
> > saddle is given (spliting force), which would be used to determine the
> > moment
> > and reinforcing in the saddle horns.
> >
> > Regarding the bearings, is simple neoprene material (1/2") normally used
> or
> > is a layered bearing system more typically seen. Any good design guidance
> > here ? The tank is 30,000 gal of SG= 1.20 material, 9 ft diam x 65 ft.
> > long.
> > Total bearing force is around 185 kips. Thanks for any input.
> >
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