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Re: 1038 steel properties

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>Can any of you give me the mechanical properties of 1038 steel (heat
>treated)?

The term 'heat treated' covers a multitude of evils and a certain degree
of virtue. Machinery's Handbook quotes Metals Progress magazine as
follows for 1040 which has a slightly greater carbon content:

Tempered at      UTS      YS        BHN
400                  113        86      262
600                  113        86      255
800                  110        80      241
1000                104        71      212
1200                  92        63      192

This is water quenched and tempered at the given temperature to the given
hardness. Oil quenched material dhas a somewhat higher strength. The
elongation varies from 19% to 29% AS you can see, 'heat treated' is a
little ambiguous. These are typical properties and shouldn't be used for
specification.

The carbon content is between 0.32 and 0.37% which means that welding is
tricky and requires controlled preheat and interpass temperatures. The
ASME Code prohibits welding in this material. I'd be real careful using
this material as a structural alloy, probably so careful that I wouldn't
use it but find myself a structural steel with the properties I need...

You want to be careful welding this

Christopher Wright P.E.    |"They couldn't hit an elephant from
chrisw(--nospam--at)skypoint.com        | this distance"   (last words of Gen.
___________________________| John Sedgwick, Spotsylvania 1864)
http://www.skypoint.com/~chrisw


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