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Re: Frost Heave

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Todd

The equation below gives the basic information for frost heave
potential.  For freezers as well as ice rinks and curling sheets, the
potential for frost heave is a long term thing subject to heat flow
through the underlying soils and insulation coupled with the
availability of water or moisture in the underlying soils.  In the long
term, actual ice lenses may build up under the freezer, drawing more
moisture thus increasing the lens over time.  Therefore, for the
stability of the floor, keeping the underlying soils in a thawed state
is the best solution.  Adding insulation is usually not the best method
except for small units since all the insulation does is slow the process
down but does not stop it.  Recycling the waste heat from the
compressors into the grade below insulation is one easy method and is
quite common for ice rinks.

A potential source of information relative to heat flow in soils would
be literature on permafrost or geotechnical aspects of frozen ground. 
The one that I have in my bookcase collecting duct is by Andersland and
Anderson.  This one addresses the issue from the other direction but the
process is the same.

> Fabio Zárate wrote:
> 
> Dear Todd:
> 
> All I´ m able to say is an equation from"Soil Mechanic  II" by Juarez
> Badillo.
> 
> The heave of the upper layer of soil caused by the frost action is:
> 
> He= 0,10 x n x H
> 
> n:  porosity = e / 1 + e ,      e: void ratio
> 
> H: frost penetration whitin   the earth
> 
> Fabio Zárate
> Civil Structural Engineer
> ZYZ Consultores
> fzarate(--nospam--at)zyzconsultores.com
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Todd Hill" <toddhillse(--nospam--at)yahoo.com>
> To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
> Sent: Monday, March 11, 2002 4:00 PM
> Subject: Frost Heave
> 
> > Does anyone know of any publications and/or journal
> > articles dealing with frost heave of footings and
> > slabs for buildings that house large freezers? My
> > company has done a couple of these with a cookbook
> > procedure. When I ask questions about where the
> > procedure came from, I get that old expression "we've
> > always done it that way". I was going to see if there
> > is anything out there to confirm this procedure.
> > Thanks in advance,
> >
> > Todd Hill
> >
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-- 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Forrest T. Braun, P.E.
BBFM Engineers, Inc.
Ph (907)274-2236
Fx (907)274-2520
Anchorage, Alaska
http://www.bbfm.com
++++++++++++++++++++++++++

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