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RE: Cylinder Breaks vs. Mix Design

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Adding to the comments of others, it has also been my experience that mix design submittals are seldom right the first time. The usual submittal is the closest mix that the batch plant sells, and we end up going round and round because they have some data that shows the compressive strength breaks meet the specified 28 day strength, but not by the over-strength amount in the spec. Usually you are still fighting about this a week before the contractor wants to pour concrete and time is a big problem. I have sometimes relented and agreed to the mix with a slightly higher cement factor and closer monitoring of the early pours for strength with the understanding the contractor is still on the hook if things don't turn out right. So far, I haven't had a problem.
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Randy Diviney [mailto:rsdiviney(--nospam--at)hayeslarge.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2002 5:35 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Cylinder Breaks vs. Mix Design

I have a quick question on review of concrete submissions.


Should I be concerned with the concrete mix design submittals if the cylinder breaks are satisfactory? If so , what should I look out for?



TIA





Randal S. Diviney P.E.

Director of Structural Engineering

Hayes Large Architects

(814)946-0451

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