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RE: OSB panel question

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Kipp.

Shouldn't be a problem.  Allowable shear loads on sheathing would be the same even if the strong axis was oriented parallel with the ground.  As a side note, most roof diaphragms used in the concrete-tilt warehouses in your area actually have plywood/OSB that spans in the weak direction.  (It's easier to built that way).  The gravity loads are reduced for sheathing spanning in the weak direction, but typically not enough where a standard 25 psf snow load would be a problem.

Tim Spengler PE, SE
Allstructure Engineering LLC
1125 Royal Ct.
Portland, Oregon
(503)997-9898

-----Original Message-----
From: Kipp.A.Martin(--nospam--at)us.mwhglobal.com
[mailto:Kipp.A.Martin(--nospam--at)us.mwhglobal.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 02, 2002 3:13 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: OSB panel question


I haven't done much wood design in the last 10 years, so I'm a little rusty
on a few things.  My church is having a new preschool built, and I took a
look at the construction over the weekend.  It is basically a large house
like structure of approximately 3000 sq. ft. with 2x6 stud walls and OSB
sheathing on the walls.  The OSB panels are standard 4' X 8' panels, 7/16"
thick.  There is a mark on one side that says something like "Strength
Axis" and has arrows pointing down the long direction of the panel.  Now I
remember that the strong direction of most plywood panels is in the long
direction and that is why we always detailed roofs and walls with the long
direction of the panel perpendicular to the joists and studs.  The panels
on my church's building have been installed with the long dimension
vertical, parallel to the studs.  Other than that, the workmanship is
excellent.  The framing is square and well connected.  The seismic holdowns
are properly installed, and the OSB panels are properly nailed.  Does
having the weak axis of the panels span between the studs significantly
weaken the wall?  Does it decrease the shear capacity of the shear walls?
I'm going to take a look at the drawings first chance I get, but I wanted
to get the list's opinions.

--Kipp Martin, S. E.
  Portland, Oregon



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