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ADA (Almost done)

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dparsons(--nospam--at)msc-engineers.com wrote:

<< Bill:  Texas has an "equivalent" ADA and all plans are checked by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulations.>>

Davis.

California also has its own "accessibility" laws.  As I understand how it works, when you do ADA work, you need to comply to state codes.  However, if a lawsuit is brought against the owner, then the basis is the federal ADA law.  So, technically, if you meet state codes, you still could be sued for non-compliance.  For example, I recall being told that the dimensions for a bath alcove used to be different by state codes than by federal law (I'm pretty sure they are the same now).  You could get a permit and build the alcove, but later be sued for non-compliance.  

Carl Sramek    

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