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RE: wood panel wall aspect ratios: shear transfer around openings

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 "Yousefi, Ben" <Ben.Yousefi(--nospam--at)ci.sj.ca.us> wrote:

...... In regard to satisfying statics in the spandrels above and below the openings, I think it's a waist of time. If you are designing the piers to take all the load, what is the point of analyzing the shear flow in the spandrels? The worst that could happen is that you could have a few nails pop in the spandrel and the force getting redistributed to the pier, which were designed to take the load in the first place.

What are you talking about? Piers may be OK in shear, but what about overturning?If you ignore spandrels (i.e. let it fail) then your uplift will go thru the roof (how about 15,000 lbs), and you need one HD at each end of piers. What about width-to-height ratio limitation?

Scott
 
The intent of placing that Figure in the 97 UBC, as I recall, was to provide an alternate way of meeting the aspect ratio, since the limits on the ratio were reduced in that edition. I remember this well since I was on the ICBO Lateral Design Committee that year. Kelly Cobeen, representing SEAOC, was the originator of the idea. And there was much discussion on whether we should place a figure in the code, since much of the code is prescriptive language. But finally it was decided that the best way to convey the idea was by inserting a figure in the code.
 
At no time was there any discussion of altering how you place the holdowns in the wall. Everything else remains unchanged. The Perforated shear wall concept is intended to address the alternative to this, which is allowing the wall as a whole to be analyzed for overturning. But that is a completely different method of design and has nothing to do with Figure 23-II-1.
 
In regard to satisfying statics in the spandrels above and below the openings, I think it's a waist of time. If you are designing the piers to take all the load, what is the point of analyzing the shear flow in the spandrels? The worst that could happen is that you could have a few nails pop in the spandrel and the force getting redistributed to the pier, which were designed to take the load in the first place.
 
Then again that's my opinion and you may not agree with it!
 
Ben Yousefi, SE
San Jose, CA

 



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