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RE: Snow Density -FYI

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Recent snow densities in central New Jersey were documented at some roof failures at approximately 27 PCF or about 50% greater than what you would have expected based on the standard BOCA drift calculations.

 

D. Matthew Stuart, P.E., S.E., P.Eng.

Senior Project Manager

Schoor DePalma Engineers and Consultants

200 State Highway Nine

Manalapan, NJ 07726

732-577-9000 (Ext. 1275)

732 -431-9428 (Fax)

mstuart(--nospam--at)schoordepalma.com

 

-----Original Message-----
From: AnconAssoc(--nospam--at)aol.com [mailto:AnconAssoc(--nospam--at)aol.com]
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2003 9:20 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Snow Density -FYI

 

Thanks for the addition info everyone and just as a rather important side note, the density of snow can end up alot higher then some of the base sources report.  Info from Army Corp of Engineers @

http://www.crrel.usace.army.mil/cerd/snowload/Emergency_Snow_Removal.htm

shows snow densities of up to 50 lb per cu. ft.  which seemed high but we were doing a bit of work involving roofs this weekend because of all the problems this past weekend and I did some field measurements on the snow in my back yard and got numbers in the 40 to 50 pcf range and this was for none satiturated snow.  This was do to the snow compacting and the rain on top of it but just thought it could be something that you may want to keep in the back of your mind if you are ever involved something like that in the future that most of the snow information is just for snow as it falls not several days later. 

       An additional FYI, it seems that several of the collapses were caused by snow blocking all the drainage on some of the roofs.  There were reports of  6 inches of standing water on some roofs.

-Bill King, PE