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Re: CMU Wall Design for Out-of-Plane Loads

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Kenny,

When I first looked at the sections in question, I would have said that
no, the equations in section 2108.2.4.4 are NOT meant to be used with section
2108.2.4.5.   This is due to the idea that I tend to think that if there
are two sections present then the intent is that there is meant to be two
different sets of provisions/procedures.

BUT, being the curious fellow that I am, I decided to look at the 2002
MSJC to see what they had since the strength provisions in the 2002 MSJC
are based off of the strength provisions in the 2000 IBC which at based
off of the strength provisions in the 1997 UBC.

In both the 2000 IBC and the 2002 MSJC, the section for the higher axial
stress (equivalent to the UBC section 2108.2.4.5) directly refer back to
the section for the lower axial stress (equivalent to the UBC section
2108.2.4.4).  Thus, it appears that even though there are two sections, it
appears that in essence both sections a intented to use the same
provisions/procedures (i.e. the equations in the 2108.2.4.4 section).

I am discussing this with someone that I know on the MSJC.  If I find
anything out contray to what I mentioned in the previous paragraph, I will
let you know.

HTH,

Scott
Ypsilanti, MI




On Tue, 4 Mar 2003, Kenny Yip wrote:

> I posted the following question last Wednesday or Thursday, but so far no
> one has ever responded it.  I think my question must be a challenging one.
> I post it here one more time to see if I can be of any luck.
>
> Dear Fellow Engineers:
>
> Under section 2108.2.4.4 of 97UBC, there are seven equations (from 8-19 to
> 8-25) associated with walls having axial load of 0.04fm' or less.  I am
> wondering if this set of formulas can be equally applied to the next
> section (i.e. 2108.2.4.5) for walls with axial load between 0.04fm' and
> 0.2fm' and the slenderness ratio h/t does not exceed 30.  No equations,
> other than (8-26), are given in this section.
>
> My axial stress is 135 psi under service load (my fm' = 2500 psi), and h/t =
> 18.5.  I have talked to some engineers.  Some said that I can use those
> equations and some told me that I can not use them.  What do you think?
>
> I appreciate your informative advice.
>
>
> Kenny Yip, P.E.
> Jones Engineers
> Bellingham, WA
>
>
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