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Re: stone wall

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Gail, and others,

        I would recommend not doing a project like this without a permit.  At
the very least (in Canada anyway) the next owner's lawyer will find this out
when comparing the property tittle against outstanding building permits as part
of the tittle transfer (Yes, lawyers actually do do something useful for the
fees they charge in real estate transfers; or if they don't the new owner can
sue the lawyer).

        Another group who check out things like this are mortgage companies
financing the next owner.  They actually (again, in Canada) have a surveyor
survey the property looking for violations before they will put up the money.
My own brother got caught in this trap; he bought a house paying cash up to the
existing mortgage and, when he came to sell the house, the company financing the
next owner found that the detached garage had been built over a utility
easement.  A permit to build the garage had been issued but The City had made
the mistake in approving the permit for it to be built over the easement.  My
brother had to wait several months before he finally got his money out of the
house and almost became the mortgage holder himself.

        In talking about "how we do it in Canada" I have no doubt that U.S.
lawyers and U.S. mortgage companies are at least diligent as Canadian and maybe
more so.

        Good luck with the wall.

Regards,

H. Daryl Richardson.

"Andrew D. Kester" wrote:

> Gail:
> I have found that if you do the work on the weekends when the city building
> department is closed, or at night, and do it quickly enough where noone
> notices, you can get a lot built without a permit. It also depends on how
> nosey your neighbors are, and if they like the finished product. If you
> build an ugly wall or something they don't like they are more likely to
> place that anonymous call. Since I have an old ugly house, everything I do
> to it my neighbors compliment me on (if they only knew).  I know an SE who
> has practically doubled the size of his house, replaced his septic system,
> etc., without a permit. It is all probably done twice as well as most of the
> junk permitted in residential. I figure that if I do something that a
> building department doesn't like (because I did not get their permission), a
> signed and sealed letter is like my get-out-of-jail free card. It may seem a
> little big headed of me, but how many decks have calcs done and then built
> by that same SE? Those rules are for mere mortals, (evil laugh) who ha ha ha
> ha ha!
>
>  But things may be different in the land of politicians :)
>
> Andrew D. Kester
>
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