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Historical Chinese Tower w/rocking base.

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This one will not help to get or finish any design jobs.

Can anyone verify the following?
Is there a Chinese engineer that documented the 1965 study?

The Jianfusi Xiaoyanta, or Hsiaoyenta, or Little Goose Pagoda, 1.5
kilometers South of red Bird Gate in the Ward, South of the Chienfu Temple,
in the City of Xian, or Sian, or Ch'ang-an, China.

The pagoda has survived nearly 70 major earthquakes over its 1,300 year
lifetime.  ...a 1487 quake split the pagoda in two.  Another quake 34 years
later smashed the two halves back together.  The story of the miraculous
"healing" is recorded on a lintel of the pagoda by the skeptical official
Wang He, who visited the temple on a night in 1555.

At one time the pagoda stretched up for 15 stories but earthquakes have
reduced the height to 13 stories or 43 meters (141ft)

It was built with layers of bricks but without any cement in between. The
bracket style in traditional Chinese architecture was also used in the
construction. The seams between each layer of bricks and the "prisms' on
each side of the pagoda are clearly visible.

Yi-Ching built a pagoda .... In 706 (AD), ...a forty-five-meter tower ....
In 1965, workmen excavating the pagoda's base to make sure it had sufficient
support discovered why it had been able to withstand earthquakes that had
leveled the surrounding buildings: it was built like a round-bottomed doll
that rolls back and then returns to its original position....

David Merrick, SE


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