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RE: Shading Concrete in CAD Detail

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Rich,

I use this all the time and not just for concrete. When using it for
concrete, I use a shade/poche for pre-cast concrete, concrete hatch
pattern for new concrete, and diagonal lines for existing concrete.

The way to do it in autocad is to assign whatever color/pen you are
using for your poche an appropriate shading percentage when setting up
your plotting configurations. I have about 6 different shades set up (I
only use about 2) in my pen table and they range in 15-40% shades. It
becomes too dark for most applications once you get past 30% shade. On
bond or vellum, the copies look fine to me with the shading.

Another helpful thing is when in autocad to use the "Tools-Display
Order-Send to Back"  pull down command in autocad. What this does is put
your shade in the back of the autocad display so you can still see any
lines crossing through the shaded area or other things like rebar when
you look at the screen.

Also, make sure your plotter is configured so LINES MERGE, otherwise,
the poche/shade will be the only thing displayed when printed.

Hth
-gerard
Santa Clara, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: richard lewis [mailto:rlewistx(--nospam--at)juno.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2003 8:03 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Shading Concrete in CAD Detail

I would like to ask about what your office standard practice is to shade
or hatch concrete in a section or detail.

About 15 years ago, when drafting was done manually, the draftsmen at
the
company I worked for used a sticky-back type shading material to shade
new concrete that was cut through in a section.  This was applied to the
back side of the mylar at the detail.  This emphasized the area of
concrete that was sliced in section verses what was beyond the slice and
not cut.  As CAD work progressed they started using solids and then
solid
hatching to shade the section so it plotted out and when printed it
would
have a shaded down fill.  With pen styles in AutoCAD 2000 this helped
immensely and very good details with shaded concrete could be produced
and printed.

Now, most printers are using photocopy technology instead of the
blue-line paper from the ammonia process.  It comes out black and looks
nice, EXCEPT, what shaded nice in a blueprint now looks terrible as a
photocopy.  What are you doing, if anything, to hatch your details.  I
prefer not to use the concrete hatch symbol if possible.  My tradition
has been to shade new concrete and use the standard hatch symbol for
existing concrete.

Some of you may not know what I am talking about and need to ask your
draftsman.

Thanks.

Rich

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