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Re: NDA Question

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I do not believe trying to protect your "way of doing something" with
employee non-disclosure agreements is appropriate.  We are obligated to
train, teach, and pass on our experience as professionals to the next
generation.  Trying to claim ownership and deny subsequent use of the
experience an employee gains while working for you is the wrong mentality,
both short term (i.e. attitude, self worth, personal growth) and long term
for the profession as a whole.  I want the people I work with to be the best
they can be, benefit from any experience I can share, and contribute with
ideas and opinions of their own.  If someone leaves our office hopefully the
person is a better engineer for the time they were here, and a contributing
member of the profession.

I have lasting relationships with the people who were my mentors in the
early stages of my career, and bless them for the knowledge and patience
they were kind enough to share.  By the "non-disclosure" attitude this list
would not exist; after all someone might use the information to their own
personal benefit or profit.

Paul Feather PE, SE
pfeather(--nospam--at)SE-Solutions.net
www.SE-Solutions.net
----- Original Message -----
From: "Johnny Drozdek" <jdrozdek(--nospam--at)keymark.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Tuesday, May 06, 2003 11:05 AM
Subject: NDA Question


> I have a question regarding non-disclosure agreements.  Do consulting
engineering firms typically ask their employees to sign non-disclosure
agreements?  If so, what are the primary stipulations in such an agreement.
I understand that in general, spreadsheets, programs, and other tools
developed by the employee (a) on company time and/or (b) with company
resources such as computers, etc. are the property of the company.
>
> However, over time the employee learns & develops certain styles and
preferences, such as how to detail certain connections or how to design
certain aspects of the structure.  This type of "know-how" doesn't seem to
be so black-and-white.  I am interested in the opinions of people on this
list regarding this topic.
>
> Are there any other "normal" restrictions that an employer typically
imposes upon their engineering employees?
>
> Thanks in advance,
> Johnny Drozdek, P.E.
>
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