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RE: Corridor loading

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Seth,

I agree with Gerard.  When doing office buildings, especially "cube farm"
office buildings, I have nominally used 100 psf for the live loading (80
for the actual live load and 20 for the partition loading...you can use
the partition as either dead or live for various parts of the design
depending on which produces the "worst" effect...i.e. treat as live for
gravity loading, especially if doing it by LRFD/strenth design).  Even
though this might cost more upfront during the original construction of
hte building, it saves money when they reconfigure the office space and
the corridor now needs to go through the old office space.

If you are dead set on going tight to the code load minimums (or the
ownere is a complete penny pincher and is insisting on it), then what I
have done/seen in the past is to have small loading diagrams on the
structure plans that indicate where the various live loadings are located.
This is basically an architectural floor plan with shading/hatching to
shows the various loads.  While in reality, these "loading plans" could go
either in the architectural sets or the structural sets, I personally
would keep them in the structural sets...this way when some structural
engineering needs to reinforce the floor framing for the eventual future
reconfigurations, it would likely be easier to fine.  Now, the difficult
part is that according to some codes (as pointed out before) you would
also have to indicate these loading areas in the actual building.

HTH,

Scott
Ypsilanti, MI


On Mon, 2 Jun 2003, Gerard Madden, SE wrote:

> If this is a new building, use 80 psf live load and 20 psf partition
> load and then you don't need to worry about it. I haven't seen 50 psf
> used in a while except for little office mezzanines in warehouses. This
> gives you maximum flexibility for the inevitable re-model 5 years from
> now.
>
> -gerard
> Santa Clara, CA
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Seth W. Cutler [mailto:seth(--nospam--at)rlmorrisonengr.com]
> Sent: Monday, June 02, 2003 3:24 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: Corridor loading
>
> I'm actually using UBC 97 but I'll take a look to see what is required
> for designating it.  When you say your drawings, I'm assuming you mean
> the structural plans.  Do I need to designate partition loading as well?
> It is considered a dead load so I'm guessing not.
>
> FYI:  My loads are as follows:
>
> Office:  20 psf partition (dead) , 50 psf Live
> Manuf:  75 psf Live
> Corridor:  100psf Live  (I can't imagine posting this at the exit paths)
>
> At 03:00 PM 6/2/2003, you wrote:
>
>
>
> >>>I also have some floors that have manufacturing, office, and corridor
> loading on the same floor.  Do I need to show on my plan which areas are
> designed for which loading?
>
> Not sure what code you're in, but take a look at IBC 2000 Sections
> 1603.3 and 1603.4 - They are particularly poorly worded, but they
> require that your drawings show which areas are designed for what live
> load, and that signs be posted in the building anywhere that the live
> load designed for is greater than 50 psf.
>
>
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