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RE: Column Anchor Bolt Placement

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So where does OSHA differentiate between a column and a post?  In another 
words, what is the definition for a post as far as OSHA is concerned?
> This is the OSHA Code
> A post is different unless it is a safety device.
> 
> § 1926.755 Column anchorage.
> (a)	General requirements for erection stability. 
> (1) All columns shall be anchored by a minimum of 4 anchor rods (anchor
> bolts).
> (2) Each column anchor rod (anchor bolt) assembly, including the
> column-to-base plate weld and the column foundation, shall be designed to
> resist a minimum eccentric gravity load of 300 pounds (136.2 kg) located 18
> inches (.46m) from the extreme outer face of the column in each direction at
> the top of the column shaft.
> (3) Columns shall be set on level finished floors, pre-grouted leveling
> plates, leveling nuts, or shim packs which are adequate to transfer the
> construction loads.
> (4) All columns shall be evaluated by a competent person to determine
> whether guying or bracing is needed; if guying or bracing is needed, it
> shall be installed.
> (b) Repair, replacement or field modification of anchor rods (anchor bolts).
> 
> (1) Anchor rods (anchor bolts) shall not be repaired, replaced or
> field-modified without the approval of the project structural engineer of
> record.
> (2) Prior to the erection of a column, the controlling contractor shall
> provide written notification to the steel erector if there has been any
> repair, replacement or modification of the anchor rods (anchor bolts) of
> that column.
> 
> Argan Johnson Jr. P.E.
> The STAR Group/STAR SEISMIC
> Makers Buckling Restrained Braces
> 3070 Rasmussen Rd, Suite 260
> Park City UT 84098
> 435-940-9222 ph
> 801-560-3178 Cell
> 435-655-0073 Fax
> arganj(--nospam--at)starseismic.net
>  
>  visit our websites at
> www.starseismic.com
> www.powercatbraces.com
>  
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Michael Hemstad [mailto:mlhemstad(--nospam--at)yahoo.com] 
> Sent: Monday, June 09, 2003 12:05 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Column Anchor Bolt Placement
> 
> Richard Lewis wrote:
> 
> "I have a question concerning OSHA 4 bolt column
> anchors.  I have a = W14x34 column as part of a small
> rigid frame.  I can fit all 4 bolts inside the column
> flanges.  Is that allowed, or do the bolts have to be
> outside the column flanges?"
> 
> Richard,
> Since no one else has asked, I will:  How do you fit 4
> anchor bolts inside the flanges of a W4x13?  We have a
> hard time making them fit inside a W8x31.  The people
> who put these things up tend to have big hands.
> 
> I believe the OSHA rules have an exception for steel
> members weighing less than 300 pounds, referred to as
> "posts."  Admittedly, 300 pounds doesn't get you much
> of a post; I think it's intended for short members,
> for example something holding up a stair landing. 
> Besides, the idea of a 290 pound post falling over on
> someone doesn't sound too cool to me.  We very seldom
> try to cheat on the intent of that rule, legal or not.
>  Pressure to do so almost always springs from
> architects who are trying to make columns disappear
> into a wall or something.  We try to get together with
> the architect early enough to make sure we have room
> for our framing.  Not to turn this into an inane
> lecture--sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.
> 
> Mike Hemstad, P.E.
> TKDA
> St. Paul, Minnesota
>  
> 
> 
> 
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