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Re: Future Generations of Engineers

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Daryl,

Nominally, the system is supposed to work such that 1 credit equals one
hour of class contact time.  As it turns out, this does not quite hold
true for lab sessions, but does hold relatively true for lecture type
session.  A 3 credit class that is all lectures will typically meet for 3
hours each week.  When I was in school (and I assume it is still somewhat
the case), a 2 credit chemistry lab really was 4 hours a week (1 hour of
lecture and a 3 hour lab session).  Similar for other lab sessions.  Thus,
for my alma mater, Michigan, you end up with 16 credits each semester on
average in order to get the required 128 credits in four years.  This
amounts to something on the order of 16 to 20 hours of CLASS time each
week.  Figure that you can roughly double that when you add in time spent
on homework assignments, depending on the individual.

HTH,

Scott
Ypsilanti, MI


On Tue, 29 Jul 2003, Daryl Richardson wrote:

> Fellow engineers,
>
>         I'd like to compare my class time with yours but I don't quite
> visualize your credit system.
>
>         When I went to university the undergraduate program consisted of 30 to
> 32 hours of class/lab contact time per week for eight 14 week terms.  We had
> no humanities or english classes and only a couple of non technical option in
> the fourth year.  We did have the option to select a concentration in the
> fourth year; the choices included such things as municipal, highways,
> structures, hydraulics and hydrology, and general; but on close examination
> the difference between any two amounted to only about three half courses for
> the full year.  I chose the general option because it had the "full load" of
> all courses and only one non technical option (In those days I was afraid of
> "non technical options").
>
>         Any comparisons that anyone would like to make would be welcome.
>
> Regards,
>
> H. Daryl Richardson
>
> Scott Maxwell wrote:
>
> > Eric,
> >
> > Just a question to make sure that I am comparing apples to apples and not
> > apples to organges...when you went to A&M, were you under a semester
> > system or a quarters system?  I ask because I know that Michigan State at
> > the time that I was in school at Michigan was under the quarter system and
> > required on the order of 140 or so credits.  Michigan State is now on the
> > semester system just like Michigan and now requires 128 credits just like
> > Michigan does (and did while I was in school...88 to 92).
> >
> > Scott
> > Ypsilanti, MI
> >
> > On Mon, 28 Jul 2003, Eric Green wrote:
> >
> > > Maybe I am not following all of this as carefully as I should be so I
> > > amy be treading over old ground, but I will simply suggest that we
> > > return to the old ways. When I graduated from A&M in 1987, a degree in
> > > Civil Engineering took 145 hours. This was reasonably accomplished in
> > > four years by most students (there are always a few on the five year
> > > plan), and I got all the education I needed, including some liberal arts
> > > classes that I did not want to take (and in retrospect I still a waste
> > > of time). What is wrong with this approach?
> > >
> > > Eric Green
> > >
> > >
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