Need a book? Engineering books recommendations...

Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: Freezer Slab

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Title: RE: Freezer Slab

Amerifreeze has constructed some of their freezer facilities in the past using a subgrade system that involves 3 to 4 feet of dry granular fill above a vapor barrier. From what I understand the systems have worked successfully.

 

D. Matthew Stuart, P.E., S.E., P.Eng.

Senior Project Manager

Schoor DePalma Engineers and Consultants

Manalapan Structural Department

200 State Highway Nine

Manalapan, NJ 07726

732-577-9000 (Ext. 1275)

908-309-8657 (Cell)

732 -431-9428 (Fax)

mstuart(--nospam--at)schoordepalma.com

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Meyer, Jonathan [mailto:jmeyer(--nospam--at)webbersmith.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 30, 2003 8:02 AM
To: 'seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org'
Subject: RE: Freezer Slab

 

Jim,

I have been involved in the design and repair of freezer buildings for a number of years. My company routinely repairs this type of freezer floor heaving. First, is there a floor warming system in place? If so, is it turned on? Is it leaking? You will need to know what is below the slab to insure that your repairs don't impact any systems that may be below the slab. Typical floor warming systems are either glycol or electric. There is also a gravity air system which has conduit below the slab that daylights out the foundation wall. The idea is that ambient air will flow through the conduit (usually 4" - 6" PVC) and keep the subgrade warm enough to prevent freezing and subsequent heaving. These systems typically work OK for the first 5 to 10 years, then they regularly fail. Most fail due to blockages (i.e. nesting critters - not very desirable in a food facility) or changes to the freezer that lengthen the original conduits which reduces the effectiveness. Or the owner of the facility blocks them with pallets or another building. Another thing to look for is moisture infiltration nearby. Is the grading around the structure correctly sloped away? Have any changes been made to change the grading since the freezer was built?

There are a few repair options depending on the answers to the questions above. If you need further information, contact me privately and we can discuss.

Jon Meyer, P.E.
Webber Smith Associates
jmeyer(--nospam--at)webbersmith.com