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RE: Request for Earthquake References

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Gary:

Harold (as usual) provides some good advice, especially with regards to
the NEHRP Provisions and other BSSC documents.  To some degree, however,
they are somewhat limited in terms of examples (at least the actual NEHRP
Provisions are...there are other BSSC documents that provide some
example-like things).

I have never seen or use "The Seismic Handbook" that Harold mentions, but
would assume that it likely is a "practical-based" text book, based upon
having seen and use the "Structural Steel Designer's Handbook", the
"Building Design and Construction Handbook", and the "Wood Engineering and
Construction Handbook" (and the "Electrical Engineering Handbook" since my
grandfather wrote the section on DC generator if I recall
correctly...don't have it sitting around in easy access).  I also assume
that it is rather useful just from the fact that Harold recommended it.

Some other items to looks at that definitely have examples:

"Structural Engineering Review Manual" by Yousefi, Son, and Sabelli
"Seismic Design of Buildings and Bridges" by Williams
"Seismic and Wind Design of Concrete Buildings" published by PCA (Portland
         Cememt Association) (note there are several versions...one for
         2000 IBC, 1997 UBC, and 1994 UBC)
"Design of Low-Rise Concrete Buildings for Earthquake Forces" by PCA
"Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete and Masonry Buildings" by Pauley
         and Priestly

Of the above, the first two are basically ALL examples and sample
problems.  They both focus on the 1997 UBC but cover all materials.  I
have them both for studying for the Washington Structural III exam (when I
stop being lazy, that is).  The next two are aimed at concrete structures
under seismic loading.  I have not really used either, but I believe that
my friend used the first of the two when she studied for the Structual I
and II exam for her Illinois SE license.  The last is a pretty standard
text book for use in concrete (and masonry) courses that deal with seismic
issues.

If you want some more theoretical background on seismic issue (i.e.
structural dynamics etc), then I have the two following structural
dynamics books:

"Dynamics of Structures: Theory and Applications to Earthquake
       Engineering" by Chopra
"Dynamics of Structures" by Clough and Penzien

The former was "used" by my structural dynamics course.  Personally, I
have never really used either too much, so I don't really know how good
they are.

Also, I have "Design of Earthquak- Resistant Buildings" by Wakabayashi.
It was used in my "Design for Dynamic Forces" class (basically taking the
theories of structural dynamics and earthquake behaviour and "converting"
them into practical use...i.e. how code provisions "come" from things like
response spectra, etc).  I personally did not find the book to useful at
the time that I took the class, but then that could have been cause I was
an undergrad taking a PhD level class so my "absorbtion" rate had not been
strengthened by time and experience (but the class turned out to be the
most practical class that I took and I kind of became the "expert" on
seismic and wind issues at my early jobs...largely cause we were exposed
to the SEAOC Blue Book [basis of UBC seismic provisions], the NEHRP
Provisions [basis of BOCA code seismic provisions which was prevelent in
my area] and the ASCE 7 wind load provisions.

If you want steel seismic related stuff, I am sure AISC likely has some
worthwhile publications on their web site (or that Charlie can point to).
You might be better served by taking AISC's seminar on seismic design and
the New 2002 AISC seismic provisions.  There are up coming seminars in
Cleveland, Dallas, Philly, and Charlotte (as well as other locations that
are "outside" of my "region"...check out the AISC website).  I have not
taken this seminar, but AISC seminars are generally pretty good with some
examples.  FWIW, the seminar is done by Michael Engelhardt of U. of Texas,
who is definitely very knowledgable and from my past experience does a
rather good job with presentations.

HTH,

Scott
Ypsilanti, MI (about as non-seismic as you can get <grin>)




On Wed, 10 Sep 2003, Sprague, Harold O. wrote:

> First you should go to the BSSC web site and download the NEHRP Provisions
> and Commentary (FEMA 368 & FEMA 369).  This stuff is free.
> There is supposed to be an applications manual out some time for the NEHRP.
>
> FEMA has a ton of very good information on seismic design.  Go to the BSSC
> web site and click on Publications for a bunch of very good free
> information.
>
> By the way, the Canadian National Committee on Earthquake Engineering is a
> member of the BSSC.
>
> Next I would advise you obtain Farzad Naeim's book, "The Seismic Handbook."
>
> Regards,
> Harold O. Sprague
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Gary Hodgson & Associates [mailto:ghodgson(--nospam--at)vaxxine.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2003 10:44 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Request for Earthquake References
>
> I'd like to ask the list's assistance for the following:  I am
> writing to the National Research Council of Canada (which produces
> our National Building Code) to complain about some of the earthquake
> provisions and request clarification of them.
>
> As one from an area of low seismic activity and, being seismically
> challenged, I would like to obtain a list of references on EQ design,
> preferably those with lots of design examples to either reinforce my
> arguments or show me the error of my ways.
>
> As a sole practitioner, I am not involved in any skyscrapers but more
> often single or multi-unit residential units, small and medium
> buildings (with and without crane structures) and storage racks.
> Perhaps limiting the size of the structure will narrow down the range
> of references and limit expenses.  In the past, I have seen reference
> to the SEOC blue book and a book (review manual) by Ben Yousefi.
>
> Before I spend any money on publications with which I'm unfamiliar, I
> would appreciate people's input.  Because we work with different
> codes than the US, it is important to find publications with design
> examples so I can, hopefully, translate them to Canadian
> requirements.
>
> thanks,
> Gary Hodgson, P.Eng.
> Niagara Falls, ON
>
>
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