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Re: Water Proof Membrane

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I appreciate everyone's input on this.  I should say that the cracking of
the slab is not too extensive.  The slab was well jointed when
constructed but there are some cracks occurring on the walk.  The
underside of the slab is in good condition.  There aren't any spots where
spalling has occurred or where rust stains are evident.  There are just
some hairline cracks that leak.  The building is located in East Texas so
deicing salts are not an issue.  It has a canopy over it but it is very
high and windblown rain comes on the walk.

The onwer obviously doesn't want to spend much money on it.  Taking the
existing slab out and replacing it is pretty much out of the question
unless I find some other problems.  

I recall that about 12 years or so ago there was a product termed as a
"Silane" that kind of worked like wax on a car if I were to simplify it. 
The silane made the water bead up into balls that were too big to enter
the pores of the concrete.  Is that something that others have used?  I
would imagine this would be a periodic maintenance application.  Any
problems with UV exposure to it?

James, I'm not sure what you mean by "lowering the soffit" in your note
below.

Thanks a gain for all past and future input!

Rich

On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 10:12:41 -0400 "jccpc" <jccpc(--nospam--at)msn.com> writes:
> Before entering on an epoxy repair, consider first whether the cracks 
> are
> affecting the structural performance of the wall. If they are not, 
> and the
> cracks are due to thermal movement or other non-structural recurring 
> cause,
> use a flexible waterproofing sealant rather than an epoxy.
> 
> Also consider what is causing the leakage through the sidewalk 
> (assumed from
> your post). In NYC, this is a common construction and a common cause 
> is the
> application of salt to the sidewalk during the winter. This can have 
> a large
> impact on the choice of waterproofing membrane. If would be better 
> to seek a
> solution which avoids the cause rather the corrects the resulting 
> problem.
> You indicated you could not raise the level of the sidewalk - can 
> you lower
> the level of the soffit?
> 
> James Cohen, PE
> James Cohen Consulting, PC
> http://expertpages.com/jccpc
> 
> 
> 
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