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RE: Plated wood truss failures?

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Even if they install compression strut bracing, they may not connect it back to an adequate structural support.

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Haan, Scott M. [mailto:HaanSM(--nospam--at)ci.anchorage.ak.us]
Sent:
Thursday, December 04, 2003 11:20 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Plated wood truss failures?

 

Municipality of Anchorage inspectors pay close attention to the truss drawings and also have required gable end wall bracing.  However get outside the Building Safety Service area and truss bracing frequently does not get installed locally. 

 

Bracing truss compression members is a big deal if you are in areas that receives a lot snow.  I would complain to your local Building Official if you find that truss bracing is being missed as a general rule and go to them with pictures and truss drawings.

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Nuttall, Davin J. [mailto:dnuttall(--nospam--at)somervilleinc.com]
Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2003 10:07 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Plated wood truss failures?

 

I wish that this were not the case, but in my area lack of lateral supports for wood roof trusses is the rule and not the exception.

 

There is not enough wording, specifications, field visits or nasty grams which will change this fact.

 

I hope I do not sound too frustrated :)

 

Dave Nuttall, P.E.

Green Bay, WI

 

-----Original Message-----
From: tm [mailto:rse(--nospam--at)sti.net]
Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2003 12:56 PM
To: Seaint
Subject: Plated wood truss failures?

I recently inspected a house with a truss roof system in which NONE of the lateral bracing members had been installed as required by the truss engineering.  My general experience indicates that building inspectors do not have enough time to fully inspect house framing, and that contractors do not always know how to read the truss engineering to see where bracing is required (and that the truss calcs can be confusing).  In many cases, houses do not have an actual engineer who will go out and notice these problems.

 

Last winter I read reports of many roofs that failed under heavy snow in Colorado.  Was there any sort of pattern that would link truss failures to lack of properly installed permanent lateral bracing?  Any of you out there involved in residential construction notice problems involving permanent lateral bracing installation?

 

Thanks!