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RE: soils pressure

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Oh, by the way.  I guess I was wondering why so many replies were warning me to check the diaphragm etc.  when I was saying that I did.  I went back to my original post and realized that some of the confusion with my post may come from the fact that I actually have the same condition of excavation on two different structures with the same architect.  At one structure the diaphragm is adequate and I have designed and detailed all the load transfer situations etc.  On the other structure the diaphragm is not adequate to restrain the wall.

 

My basic question about the soil pressures comes from both structures.  On one structure they don’t like all the work (they think is way too much) that I am showing, and then don’t understand why the other situation won’t work at all.  They don’t understand that with the condition of the excavation that they will still have soil pressures on the wall.

 

Thanks again,

Joseph R. Grill, PE (Structural)

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: BCainse(--nospam--at)aol.com [mailto:BCainse(--nospam--at)aol.com]
Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2004 9:56 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: soils pressure

 

Joe-

You don't say where you are located. But here in Northern California, some of our rock can be pretty lousy and with time it often weathers to expansive clay.  As such, the pressure can build significantly over time. It sounds like you need some good geotechnical advice on this project from someone (definitely not the architect) familiar with the local materials.

 

Again, don't plan on the diaphragm resisting the load at the top unless you have a proper load path.  And fully think through the construction process (i.e., when the backfill is placed relative to the diaphragm being in place.) when designing the diaphragm.  If the wall moves, the footing you didn't build will look pretty inexpensive in hindsight.

 

Regards,

Bill Cain, SE

Berkeley CA