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RE: Lateral water pressures on walls

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Because it?s saturated and probably filled with bad soil (organic topsoil),
I?d assume the full static pressure.  Water pressure of 62.4 pcf plus the
effective AT REST pressure from the soil.

The friction between the water and the wall is zero, and the friction
between the wet soil (mud?) and the wall is very low.  I'd neglect these
values.

In Joe's problem, he has good, granular fill with a rough bedrock surface
and no standing water.  The friction will be fairly high between the rock
column and the bedrock/wall.

---
Jason Kilgore
Leigh & O'Kane, LLC
Kansas City, Missouri
________________________________________
From: Malik, Javed B. [mailto:MalikJB(--nospam--at)c-b.com] 
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2004 9:04 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Lateral water pressures on walls

For a hypothetical planter that is 50 feet long, one foot wide and 12 feet
high, full of water and no drains, how do you calculate the lateral pressure
on the long walls. I want to know the minimum width of planter at which full
hydrostatic pressure will act.
Best Regards.
Javed Malik
 



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