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Re: Chain Link loads

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Your specs provide some answers:

typically:
working load < proof load < breaking strength

working load = breaking strength / FS
proof load = working load x test factor

breaking strength is usually ultimate strength, but may be based on fy (yield) or fu (ultimate). I usually take breaking str. as the ultimate strength of the item.

By requiring a proof load of 3.6k, and a breaking strength, the engineer appears to have already applied a factor of safety. I've done this on projects where I didn't want/need a 5.0 or 6.0 factor of safety, but wanted to be able to use off the shelf components for assembly.

I would verify the "breaking strength" with the manufacturer, though you're on the right track with your 2.9k working load link having sufficient breaking strength at 14.5k.

Jordan

At 09:21 AM 5/13/2004 -0400, you wrote:
Could somebody direct me to a glossary or provide information on and differences between "working load", "breaking strength", "proof load", and "ultimate load". I have a project which calls for a pear link with a 5000# breaking strength, and manufacturers information speaks of ultimate loads which are 5 times greater than working loads. Does this mean breaking strength is ultimate load, or working load? And if ultimate is breaking, then I could utilize a 2,900# working load link (x5= 14,500# ultimate load/breaking strength)
The spec simply calls for a proof load of 3,600#
Thanks-
JIM




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