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Re: Education of Structural Designers (Draftsman)

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There is nothing wrong in asking for a designer with a 4-year degree.
Probably it might be a good idea to even ask for a masters degree or even a
PhD in CAD :)

What do you think would be the end result - the guy would probably not be
able to get a good drawing out the door.  The main qualifications for a
designer is to have experience in a good office so that he can put things
together and work with little supervision.  Ofcouse he needs to be fast in
the CAD software which he would have gained by experience.  If you are
working with steel and concrete then try to get someone with steel and
concrete experience - a guy with a 4 year degree and experience in wood will
take a while to catch up and suck up your engineers time.

This is similar to asking for a secretary (who will mostly answer phone,
file and type a few documents) to require a MBA.  Eventually he/she would be
unhappy (no matter how good the pay is) and quit.

>From a standpoint of your Architect:  Many architects (through a 4-year
course) start out as designers and then grow up to become a project
architect and higher.  But this is not the case with engineers and
designers.  You might want to educate your Architectural boss.

BTW, nowadays engineering schools make the students quite proficient in CAD
so that they can design and detail - down the road designers will be slowly
replaced.

Hope this helps.

Aswin Rangaswamy, P.E.
Cypress, CA.

----- Original Message ----- 
From: <yrmungui(--nospam--at)uci.edu>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Tuesday, May 18, 2004 9:59 AM
Subject: Education of Structural Designers (Draftsman)


> The structural department of our division of a large A/E firm has 8
> engineers.  We recently lost one of our designers and are down to two
> from three.  The architects in charge will not allow us to hire another
> structural designer unless they have a four year college degree.
>
> What is the consensus on educational requirements for structural
> designers?
>
> My experience has been that most designers have a technical school
> degree or something similar and do just fine with that.  Any supporting
> information or experiences will help us make our case to the
> higher-ups.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
>
> Matt Steiner, P.E.
> Structural Engineering Department
> DMJM design
> 999 Town & Country Road
> Orange, CA  92868
> Direct - (714) 567-2566
> Fax - (714) 567-2729
>
>
>
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