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Re: ACI 318-02 reinforcing steel questions

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Reminds me of the time, a long time ago, that I was asked
by a developer what I could do to cut the costs on a
project.  I said I would see what I could do.  After
thinking about the work required at my expense to save
him some money, I lied and said I had found an error and
that I would have to beef up the design. He, very quickly,
asked if I could leave the design as is.  I didn't feel
very proud of myself, but it was a lesson.
Gary


On 4 Jun 2004 at 13:38, Paul Crocker wrote:

> "Many developers "flip" their projects as soon as their finished. They
> don't care."
> 
> That doesn't change your professional liability.  If anything, it
> raises the likelihood you'll have a claim because you now have the
> prospect of the buyer hiring someone to inspect the building and
> review the design to find flaws to justify a lower price or to warn
> the buyer away.  If and when it is sold, you will not be dealing with
> the original developer with whom you may have some established and
> ongoing relationship, and who on that basis may be more inclined to
> talk things out first before seeking legal recourse if they perceive a
> problem to be occuring.   
> 
> The more pressure you get to stretch the limits of the code and come
> up with "creative" and "cost-effective" interpretations, the more
> careful you ought to be about the people you are dealing with.  There
> are some honest folks who just want to maximize profits, which is fair
> enough, but there are a lot of shady developers who are happy to
> pressure you as much as it takes to push the limits to save more money
> knowing that it will be you and your insurance, not them, who will
> have to open their wallets if anything goes wrong.  Think of the
> risk/reward matrix from their point of view.  If you cut corners, save
> them money, and things go fine, then they win and you break even.  If
> you cut corners, save them money, and things go bad, then they still
> win but you lose.  I don't know if that is the case here, but I tend
> to get nervous when there is pressure to start questioning good
> practice in favor of more aggressive readings of the code.  
> 
> Paul Crocker, PE, SE
> 
> 
> 
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